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PLATES.

CYMBELINE.

Two introductory scenes have been found necessary to explain the story-BELARIUS stealing the children; and the second marriage of CYMBELINE. The former to show the connexion between GUIDERIUS and ARVIRAGUS, and CYMBELINE; the latter to give the relative situations of the principal characters at the commencement of the play.

Shakspeare has rendered a few deviations from strict costume absolutely necessary; but care has been taken that such deviations are as slight as possible, and in such a course as alone was practicable, viz. importations from Rome.

B 2

I.

BELARIUS and EURIPHILE stealing GUIDERIUS and ARVIRAGUS, sons of CYMBELINE.

"BEL. At three and two years old I stole these babes.

ACT III. S. 3.

Their nurse, Euriphile,

Whom for the theft I wedded, stole these children

Upon my banishment."

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POSTHUMUS is ingratiating himself with IMOGEN, and CLOTEN receiving the first impression.

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Enter CYMBELINE and Lords.

CYM. Thou basest thing, avoid! hence, from my sight! If, after this command, thou fraught the court

With thy unworthiness, thou diest:-Away!
Thou art poison to my blood.

IMO.

More sharp than this is."

There cannot be a pinch in death

ACT I. S. 2.

The QUEEN is seen as the instigator of CYMBELINE's cruelty; and CLOTEN meditating his attack on POSTHUMUS.

IV.

POSTHUMUS' wager with IACHIMO.

"POST. I shall but lend my diamond till your return. Let there be covenants drawn between us. My mistress exceeds in goodness the lugeness of your unworthy thinking. I dare you to this match: here's my ring."

ACT I. S. 5.

V.

IACHIMO's attempt on IMOGEN.

"IACH. Let me my service tender on your lips. IMO. Away! I do condemn mine ears, that have So long attended thee.

Thou wrong'st a gentleman, who is as far
From thy report, as thou from honour; and
Solicit❜st here a lady, that disdains

Thee and the devil alike."

ACT I. S. 7.

VI.

IACHIMO stealing IMOGEN's bracelet.

"IACH. O sleep, thou ape of death, lie dull upon her! And be her sense but as a monument

Thus in a chapel lying!—Come off, come off!—
As slippery as the Gordian knot was hard.-
"Tis mine."

ACT II. S. 2.

VII.

CLOTEN tendering his services to IMOGEN.

“ CLOTEN.

Still, I swear I love you:

IMO. If you but said so, 'twere as deep with me. If you swear still, your recompense is still,

That I regard it not."

ACT II. S. 3.

VIII.

IACHIMO produces the bracelet as testimony of his having won his wager.

"IACH. I beg but leave to air this jewel: See!And now 'tis up again: It must be married

To that your diamond; I'll keep them.

Once more let me behold it: Is it that

Jove!

Which I left with her?"

ACT II. S. 4.

IX.

PISANIO having, by the order of POSTHUMUS, induced IMOGEN to go to Milford Haven to meet him, shows the letter in which POSTHUMUS commands her death.

"IMO. reads.

'Let thine own hands take away her life: I shall give thee opportunities at Milford Haven,' &c. No, 'tis slander; Whose edge is sharper than the sword; whose tongue Out-venoms all the worms of the Nile."

PIS.

ACT III. S. 4.

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