The History of Lyme-Regis, Dorset, from the Earliest Periods to the Present Day

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G. Roberts, 1823 - Lyme Regis (England) - 221 pages
 

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Page 196 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 92 - Be of good courage, and let us play the men for our people, and for the cities of our God : and the LORD do that which seemeth him good.
Page 85 - Justice of Peace) to have him dispatch abroad his Warrants to raise the Country for the apprehending of the King, and those persons the last night with him at Charmouth. But he spends his mouth in vain, a deaf ear is turned upon him, no Warrant would be issued forth.
Page 81 - Elesden solemnly engaging to see the Master of the Ship ready, (the wind blowing then fair for France) took leave of his Majesty. About an hour after came Limbry to the Inn, and assured the Colonel all things were prepared, and that about midnight his Long-boat should wait at the place appointed.
Page 82 - Road, where his servants on the 22d of the same month were all ready in her, waiting his coming ; that he going to his house about ten that night, for linen to carry with him, was unexpectedly locked into a chamber by his wife, to whom he had a little before revealed his intended voyage with some passengers into France, for whose transportation, at his return, he was to receive a considerable sum of money from Captain Ellesden.
Page 83 - Penalty was thundred out against all that should conceal the King, or any of his party who were at Worcester Fight ; and a Reward of a Thousand pounds promised to any that should betray him. She, apprehending the Persons her husband engaged to carry over to be Royalists, resolved to secure him from danger, by making him a Prisoner in his own chamber. All the persuasions he used for his liberty, were in vain : For the more he...
Page 79 - Charmouth road, and on the said two and twentieth, in the night, should receive the colonel and his company into his long-boat from the beach near Charmouth, from thence carry them to his ship, and so land them safe in France. This the colonel conjured Limbry to perform with all...
Page 96 - Lyve, presuming we could not be ready in so short a time ; bat finding us so well prepared to receive him, he wisely retired, his men being in great disorder and confusion, supposing we had pursued them, which was debated ; but the duke said ' it was not his business to fight yet, till his men had been a little disciplined, but rather to make up into the country as fast as possible, to meet his friends, not questioning but there would have been, in several parts of the kingdom, some action, on the...

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