Translating Holocaust Literature

Front Cover
Peter Arnds
Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, Nov 18, 2015 - Literary Criticism - 156 pages
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In his testimony on his survival in Auschwitz Primo Levi said “our language lacks words to express this offense, the demolition of a man”. If language, if any language, lacks the words to express the experience of the concentration camps, how does one write the unspeakable? How can it then be translated? The limits of representation and translation seem to be closely linked when it comes to writing about the Holocaust – whether as fiction, memoir, testimony – a phenomenon the current study examines. While there is a spate of literature about the impossibility to represent the Holocaust , not much has been written on the links between translation in its specific linguistic sense, translation studies, and the Holocaust, a niche this volume aims to fill.
 

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Contents

Body
7
The Dresden Archive Project A contemporary artwork
13
Translating the Passion of Ravensbrück Ted Hughes and János Pilinszky
23
Transforming Subjectivity Se questo è un uomo in Translation and Adaptation
33
Collaborative Translation The Relational Dimensions of Translating Holocaust Trauma
45
Witnessing and Translating Ulysses at Auschwitz
63
The Magical Properties of Creative Sameness The Role of Translation in Anne Michaelss Fugitive Pieces
81
Berman and Beyond The Trial of the Foreign and the Translation of Holocaust Literature
89
Translating Monika Marons Pawels Briefe as a Postmemorial Holocaust Text
107
Poetry of Memory and Trauma and their Translation
125
Translating Memory Acts of Testimony in Resnais Cayrol and Celan
139
Index
153
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

Prof. Peter Arnds is the Director of Comparative Literature and Literary Translation at Trinity College Dublin.

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