Bug-Jargal

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Broadview Press, Jul 26, 2004 - Fiction - 344 pages

Victor Hugo’s Bug-Jargal (1826) is one of the most important works of nineteenth-century colonial fiction, and quite possibly the most sustained novelistic treatment of the Haitian Revolution by a major European author. This Broadview edition makes Hugo’s novel available in a completely new English translation, the first in over one hundred years. Set in 1791, during the first months of a slave revolt that would eventually lead to the creation of the black republic of Haiti in 1804, Bug-Jargal is a stirring tale of interracial friendship and rivalry, a provocative account of the ties that bind a young Frenchman to one of the rebel leaders and the tragic misunderstandings that threaten to sever those ties completely.

This Broadview edition contains a critical introduction and a broad selection of appendices, including Hugo’s never-before-translated 1820 short story “Bug-Jargal,” contemporary reviews of the novel, documents pertaining to the young Hugo’s poetics and politics, and selections from his source materials about the Haitian Revolution.

 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text
BugJargal
BugJargal 1820
The Saint Domingue Revolt 1845
Politics and Poetics
Contemporary Reviews
Historical and Cultural Sources
Literary Sources
Map of Saint Domingue
Works Cited
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Chris Bongie is a Professor of English at Queen’s University, Kingston. He is the author of Exotic Memories: Literature, Colonialism, and the Fin de Siècle and Islands and Exiles: The Creole Identities of Post/Colonial Literature, both from Stanford University Press.

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