The Sailor Whom England Feared

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Page 115 - Selkirk's interest with his king, and esteeming as I do his private character, I wished to make him the happy instrument of alleviating the horrors of hopeless captivity, when the brave are overpowered and made prisoners of war. "It was, perhaps, fortunate for you, Madam, that he was from home ; for it was my intention to have taken him on board the Ranger, and to have detained him until, through his means, a general and fair exchange of prisoners, as well in Europe as in America, had been effected.
Page 363 - Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth.
Page 118 - I hope this cruel contest will soon be closed; but should it continue, I wage no war with the fair. I acknowledge their force, and bend before it with submission. Let not, therefore, the amiable Countess of Selkirk regard me as an enemy ; I am ambitious of her esteem and friendship, and would do anything, consistent with my duty, to merit it...
Page 194 - As we were unable to bring a single gun to bear upon the Serapis, our topsails were backed, while those of the Serapis being filled, the ships separated. The Serapis wore short round upon her...
Page 125 - When the officer came on the quarter-deck he was greatly surprised to find himself a prisoner, although an express had arrived from Whitehaven the night before. I now understood what I had before imagined, that the Drake came out, in consequence of this information, with volunteers against the Ranger. The officer told me also that they had taken up the Ranger's anchor. The Drake was attended by five small vessels full of people who were led by curiosity to see an engagement. But when they saw the...
Page 193 - What ship is that? answer immediately, or I shall be under the necessity of firing into you...
Page 125 - On the morning of the 24th I was again off Carrickfergus, and would have gone in had I not seen the Drake preparing to come out. It was very moderate, and the Drake's boat was sent out to reconnoitre the Ranger. As the boat advanced I kept the ship's stern directly towards her ; and though they had a spy glass in the boat, they came on within hail, and alongside.
Page 116 - The amiable lieutenant lay mortally wounded, besides near forty of the inferior officers and crew killed and wounded — a melancholy demonstration of the uncertainty of human prospects and of the sad reverses of fortune which an hour can produce.
Page 122 - As I have endeavoured to serve the cause of liberty, through every stage of the American revolution, and sacrificed to it my private ease, a part of my fortune, and some of my blood, I could have no selfish motive in permitting my people to demand and carry off your plate.
Page 170 - I owe to my friends and America, as to remain inactive. " My rank knows no superior in the American marine: I have long since been appointed to command an expedition with five of its ships, and I can receive orders from no junior or inferior officer whatever. " I have been here in the most tormenting suspense for more than a month since my return...

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