COMPARATIVE PSHYCHOLOGY AND UNIVERSAL ANALOGY

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Page v - We buy ashes for bread; We buy diluted wine; Give me of the true, — Whose ample leaves and tendrils curled Among the silver hills of heaven Draw everlasting dew; Wine of wine, Blood of the world, Form of forms, and mould of statures, That I intoxicated, And by the draught assimilated, May float at pleasure through all nature*; The bird-language rightly spell, And that which roses say so well.
Page v - Come lift thine eyes to lofty rhymes, Of things with things, of times with times, Primal chimes of sun and shade, Of sound and echo, man and maid, The land reflected in the flood, Body with shadow still pursued. For Nature beats in perfect tune, And rounds with rhyme her every rune, Whether...
Page v - For Nature beats in perfect tune, And rounds with rhyme her every rune, Whether she work in land or sea, Or hide underground her alchemy. Thou canst not wave thy staff in air, Or dip thy paddle in the lake, But it carves the bow of beauty there, And the ripples in rhymes the oar forsake.
Page 104 - ... face of heaven, which, from afar, Comes down upon the waters ; all its hues, From the rich sunset to the rising star, Their magical variety diffuse : And now they change ; a paler shadow strews Its mantle o'er the mountains ; parting day Dies like the dolphin, whom each pang Imbues With a new colour as it gasps away, The last still loveliest, till — 'tis gone — and all is gray.
Page 101 - While the low south wind sighs, but dare not be more rude. Were your pure lips fashioned Out of air and dew — Starlight unimpassioned. Dawn's most tender hue, And scented by the woods that gathered sweets for you ? Fairest and most lonely, From the world apart; Made for beauty only, Veiled from Nature's heart With such unconscious grace as makes the dream of Art! Were not mortal sorrow An immortal shade, Then would I to-morrow Such a flower be made, And live in the dear woods where my lost childhood...
Page 100 - TRAILING ARBUTUS. Darlings of the forest ! Blossoming alone When Earth's grief is sorest For her jewels gone — Ere the last snow-drift melts, your tender buds have blown. Tinged with color faintly, Like the morning sky, Or more pale and saintly, Wrapped in leaves ye lie, Even as children sleep in faith's simplicity.
Page 258 - And it has been already shewn, that these actions cannot be performed simply from irritation, because cold and darkness are negative quantities, and on that account sensation or volition are implied, and in consequence a sensorium or union of their nerves. So when we go into the light, we contract the iris; not from any stimulus of the light on the fine...
Page 246 - While tears fell fast from the eyes of all, the old man laid down and was soon silent in sleep. Since that, I have often plucked the white lily, and garlanded it around my head - have dipped it in its watery bed - but never have I seen it without remembering the legend of the descending star. LEGEND SECOND: HISTORICAL: THE LONG CHASE The Indian warrior of days long past, thought that distance should never be considered when he went forth to war, provided he was certain of winning the applause of...
Page 244 - ... they loved to gaze at them, for they believed them to be the residences of the good, who had been taken home by the Great Spirit. One night they saw one star that shone brighter than all others. Its location was far away in the south, near a mountain peak. For many nights it was seen, till at length it was doubted by many that the star was as far distant in the southern skies as it seemed to be. This doubt led to an examination, which proved the star to be only a short distance away, and near...
Page 245 - Young brave! charmed with the land of thy forefathers, its flowers, its birds, its rivers, its beautiful lakes, and its mountains clothed with green, I have left my sisters in yonder world to dwell among you. Young brave! ask your wise and your great men where I can live and see the happy race continually; ask them what form I shall assume in order to be loved.

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