Observations on Live Stock: Containing Hints for Choosing and Improving the Best Breeds of the Most Useful Kinds of Domestic Animals

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G. Wilkie and J. Robinson, 1807 - Cattle - 274 pages
 

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Page 77 - ... its head, it got up, pawed two or three times like an old bull, bellowed very loud, stepped back a few steps, and bolted at his legs with all its force ; it then began to paw again, bellowed, stepped back, and bolted as before ; but knowing its intention...
Page 103 - Collar. — Full from breast and shoulders, tapering gradually all the way to where the neck and head join ; the neck should be fine and graceful, and free from coarse and loose skin 6 Shoulders.
Page xiv - ... fattest. I have often wished to convey in language that idea or sensation we acquire by the touch, or feel of our fingers, which enables us to form a judgment when we are handling an animal intended to be fatted, but I have as often found myself unequal to fulfil that wish. It is very easy to know where an animal is fattest which is already made fat, because we can evidently feel a substance or quantity of fat upon all those parts which are denominated the fatting points ; but the difficulty...
Page 75 - ... with equal speed, but not to the same distance; forming a shorter circle and again returning with a bolder and more threatening aspect than before, they approach much nearer, probably within thirty yards, when they make another stand, and again...
Page 74 - At the first appearance of any person, they set off in full gallop, and, at the distance of two or three hundred yards, make a wheel round, and come boldly up again, tossing their heads in a menacing manner : on a sudden they make a full stop, at the distance of forty or fifty yards, looking wildly at the object of their surprise ; but upon the least motion being made, they all again turn round, and fly off...
Page 76 - ... practised of late years ; the park-keeper alone generally shooting them with a rifled gun, at one shot. When the Cows calve, they hide their calves for a week or ten days in some sequestered situation, and go and suckle them two or three times a-day.
Page 73 - Their colour is invariably white, muzzle black ; the whole of the inside of the ear, and about one-third of the outside from the tip, downwards, red; horns white, with black tips, very fine, and bent upwards ; some of the bulls have a thin upright mane, about an inch and a half, or two inches long...
Page 79 - ... and more mixed and marbled than that of the short-horns, in weighing more in proportion to their size, and in giving richer milk; but they are inferior to the short-horns, in giving a less quantity of milk, in weighing less upon the whole, in affording less tallow when killed, in being generally slower feeders, and in being coarser made and more leathery or bullish in the under side of the neck.
Page vi - ... should have white faces and white legs ; and that their horns should come out backwards, in such a manner, that the ears may be seen before the horns. — But a Sussex breeder insists upon it that they are both wrong; because sheep should be grey-faced and grey-legged, and have no horns. — Thus it appears how widely different these worthy people are in their opinions; and yet they cannot all be right, though they most assuredly think so. Could any of these people be prevailed upon to make an...
Page 76 - ... the horsemen rode off the bull from the rest of the herd until he stood at bay ; when a marksman dismounted and shot. At some of these huntings, twenty or thirty shots have been fired before he was subdued : on such occasions, the bleeding victim grew desperately furious, from the smarting of his wounds, and the shouts of savage joy that were echoing from every side.

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