Encyclopedia of Women and Religion in North America: Women and religion: methods of study and reflection

Front Cover
Academic Dean and Professor of Church History Emeritae Rosemary Skinner Keller, Rosemary Skinner Keller, Rosemary Radford Ruether, Marie Cantlon
Indiana University Press, 2006 - Women - 1394 pages
A fundamental and well-illustrated reference collection for anyone interested in the role of women in North American religious life.
 

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Contents

Contents
xi
Jewish Women and Ritual
xiii
Catholic Womens Colleges in the United States 881
xix
Acknowledgments
xxiii
Islam
xxx
Protestant Sunday Schools and Religious
xxxiv
Women Islam and Mosques
xli
Womanist Theology
xlv
The Psychology of Womens Religious Experience
62
Womens Spiritual Biography and Autobiography
68
The Case for Native Liberation Theology
97
62
127
Women
209
Colonial Period
221
Protestant Women in the MidAtlantic Colonies
228
Southern Colonial Protestant Women
236

Approaches to the History of Women
1
Hinduism in North America including Emerging
7
Religions and Modern Feminism
11
Latinas and ReligiousPolitical
13
Gender and Social Roles
23
North American Women Interpret Scripture
33
Mujerista Theology
42
Womens Religious Imagination
45
Social Ethics Women and Religion
52
Protestantism in British North America Canada
242
178
331
Native American Women and Christianity
362
The Protestant Womens Ordination Movement
368
250
477
The Womens Ordination Movement in
489
279
492
296
498
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

American feminist theologian Rosemary Radford Ruether was born in St. Paul, Minnesota. Ruether graduated from Scripps College in 1958 and received her doctorate in classics and patristics from Claremont Graduate School in 1956. In 1976 she became Georgia Harkness Professor of Theology at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, a position she continues to hold. An activist in the civil rights and peace movements of the 1960s, Ruether turned her energies to the emerging women's movement. During the 1970s and successive decades, feminist concerns impelled her to rethink historical theology, analyzing the patriarchal biases in both Christianity and Judaism that elevated male gender at the expense of women. Her rigorous scholarship has challenged many of the assumptions of traditionally male-dominated Christian theology. Recognized as one of the most prolific and readable Catholic writers, Ruether's work represents a significant contribution to contemporary theology, and her views have influenced a generation of scholars and theologians. Her imprint on feminist theology has been reinforced by her lectureships at a number of universities in the United States and abroad.

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