A practical detail of the cotton manufacture of the United States of America: and the state of the cotton manufacture of that country contrasted and compared with that of Great Britain; with comparative estimates of the cost of manufacturing in both countries ...

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Page 190 - Next to Richmond in importance, and in some respects in advance of it, is Petersburgh, at the head of the tide water of the Appomattox. Here Cotton Factories grow up and flourish as if by magic; there are now five or six all in full operation, and all of them extensive establishments. One of them, a short distance from Petersburgh, is inferior to few, if any, in the Northern States, and with the houses built for the workmen, forms quite a village. All these Manufactories employ white labourers. The...
Page 147 - States in 1790: every endeavour to introduce a proper system of spinning had been fruitless; and nothing but the introduction of the water frame spinning, which had superseded the jennies in England, could have laid a foundation for the successful prosecution of the business in America; and that was happily accomplished by one who was personally and practically acquainted with the business in all its details. The individual here referred to was Mr. Samuel Slater, who has justly been called the FATHER...
Page 170 - ... derive the same advantage. As regards their moral condition and character, they are not inferior to any portion of the community.
Page 71 - The Americans ran certain types of textile machinery faster than the English, and this practice represented, to some extent, a substitution of natural resources for capital. 'Driving machinery at high speed,' wrote Montgomery, 'does not always meet with the most favourable regard of practical men in Great Britain; because in that country where power costs so much, whatever tends to exhaust that power is a matter of some consideration; but in this country (that is, the USA), where water-power is so...
Page 185 - A dam of four and a half feet high, strongly framed and bolted to the rock in the bed of the river above the falls, turns the stream through a canal excavated in the trap rock of the bank, into a basin, whence, through strong guard-gates, it supplies in succession three canals on separate planes, each below the other; giving to the mills on each, a head and fall of about 22 feet. By means of the guard-gate, the volume of water is regulated at pleasure, and a uniform height preserved, avoiding the...
Page 156 - Some i observations on a few of the principal districts is all that will be attempted. It has already been stated in a former part of this work, that Massachusetts is the principal manufacturing state in this country. An act was passed by the Senate and House of Representatives of that state, in 1837, for the purpose of obtaining " Statistical information in relation to certain branches of industry within the Commonwealth.
Page 188 - Tennessee operated entirely by slave labour, there not being a white man in the Mill but the Superintendent; and according to a letter lately received from the Superintendent of one of these Factories, it appears that the blacks do their work in every respect as well as could be expected from the whites.
Page 162 - This canal was projected about the year 1790, and the proprietors were incorporated in 1792, by the name of ' The Proprietors of the Locks and Canals on Merrimac River.
Page 145 - During 1790, Almy and Brown, of Providence, manufactured 326 pieces, containing 7823 yards, of various kinds of goods. There were also several other companies and individuals in different parts of the Union, who manufactured goods from linen warps and cotton weft. But, notwithstanding these most laudable and persevering efforts, every attempt failed of success, and they saw their hopes and prospects entirely prostrated. There was no deficiency of enterprise or exertion ; no want of funds, or of men...
Page 139 - Their most powerful rivals are, doubtless, the Americans. The manufacturers of no other country can purchase their cotton so cheap, and it is presumed no country possesses so extensive water privileges ; only a small portion of which has yet been occupied. If we add to these, the intelligence and enterprising spirit of the people, it will at once be obvious to every unprejudiced mind, that the American manufacturers are the most formidable competitors with which the British have to contend in foreign...

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