The Works of Francis Bacon: Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Albans, and Lord High Chancellor of England, Volume 5

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Contents

To the lord keeper
218
To the lord keeper ibid 22 A letter to the lord treasurer Burghley re commending his first suit touching the Soli citors place
219
To the lord keeper
221
To the lord keeper
222
To the lord keeper ibid 26 To the lord keeper
223
To the lord keeper
224
To the lord keeper
225
To the lord keeper ibid 30 To the lord keeper
226
To the lord keeper
227
To my lord of Essex ibid 33 To my lord of Essex
233
To my lord of Essex
234
To my lord of Essex
237
To the queen 238
238
To Sir Robert Cecil
239
To Sir Robert Cecil
240
To Foulk Grevil
241
To my lord of Essex
242
To Sir Rolert Cecil at his leing in France ibid 45 To Sir Robert Cecil
243
A letter of advice to the earl of Essex to take upon him the care of Irish causes when Mr Secretary Cecil was in France
244
A letter of advice to the earl of Esser upon the first treaty with Tyrone before the earl was no minated for the charge of Ireland
246
A letter of advice to my lord of Essex immediately before his going into Ireland
248
To my lord of Esser
252
An answer of my lord of Essex to the preceding letter of Mr Bacon
253
To Sir Robert Cecil
255
A letter framed as from the earl in answer to
261
To my lord of Canterbury
270
To the earl of Northumberland
271
A letter to the lord of Kinlosse upon his majestys
277
Aletter to Mr Murray of the kings bedchamber285
285
To Mr Playfere desiring him to translate
291
A letter of expostulation to Sir Edward Coke attor
297
To the earlof Salisbury upon a newyears tide
303
To Sir Thomas Bodeley after he had imparted
310
To Mr Matthew upon sending to him a part of Instauratio magna
318
To Mr Matthew
319
To Mr Matthew
320
To Mr Matthew upon sending his book De sa pientia veterum
321
To the king
322
To the king
323
To the Prince of Wales dedicating his Essays to him
324
ibid
325
To Sir Vincent Skinner
327
To Sir Henry Saville
328
Of helps of the intellectual powers
332
Sir Francis Bacon to Mr Matthew about his writings and the death of a friend
335
To the king
338
To the king
342
To the king touching Peacham etc
343
To the king touching my lord chancellors reco very etc
350
To the king concerning Owens cause etc
351
To the king about a certificate of lord chief justice Coke
353
To the king of revenue and profit
360
To the king
361
To the king concerning the new company
363
To Sir George Villiers about Ropers place
366
To the king ibid 125 To the king advising him to break off with the new company
369
To the king touching the chancellors sickness
371
To Sir George Villiers
376
To Sir George Villiers about swearing him into the privy council
377
To the king of the chancery and kings bench
378
To the king on the breach of the new company383
383
To Sir George Villiers
387
To his majesty alout the earl of Somerset ibid 135 To his majesty alout the chancellors place
389
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of So merset
390
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of So merset
393
A letter to the king with his majestys olserva lions upon it
395
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of So merset
398
To Sir George Villiers of Somersets arraignment
400
To the king alout Somersets examination
402
An expostulation to the lord chief justice Coke
403
To Sir George Villiers
411
To the king about the Commendams
412
A memorial for his majesty 1616
414
To Sir George Villiers
420
Touching the Commendams
421
To Sir George Villiers
435
To Sir George lilliers
436
To Sir George Villiers
437
To Sir George Villiers
438
To Sir George Villiers atout Irish affairs ibid 154 To the king 141
441
To Sir George Villiers on sending his bill for viscount 112
442
To Sir George Villiers on sending his parent
443
To the king of Sir George Villierss patent
445
To Sir George Villiers on sending his patent sealed 416
445
To the lord viscount Villiers
448
To the earl of Buckingham
463
To the university of Cambridge
464
To the earl of Buckingham
465
To the earl of Buckingham
466
To the king about the Spanish match
467
To the earl of Buckingham
469
An account of council business and other matters
470
referred to in the fore going letter
474
To the lord keeper
475
To the earl of Buckingham
476
To the earl of Buckingham ibid 182 To the king
478
To the earl of Buckingham
481
To the king
482
To the earl of Buckingham
483
A memorial for his majesty
484
To the earl of Buckingham
486
To the earl of Buckingham
487
To the earl of Buckingham
488
To the lord keeper
489
To the earl of Buckingham
491
To the king
493
To the marquis of Buckingham
495
To Mr Matthew about reading and giving judg ment upon his writings
496
To the king ibid
499
To the lord chancellor
500
To the marquis of Buckingham
502
To the marquis of Buckingham
503
To the marquis of Buckingham
504
To the marquis of Buckingham
505
To the marquis of Buckingham
507
To tlie marquis of Buckingham
508
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 209 To the lord chancellor
510
To the marquis of Buckingham
511
To the king
512
To the king
513
To the marquis of Buckingham
514
To the lord chancellor
515
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 219 To the lord chancellor
517
To the lord chancellor
518
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 222 To the lord chancellor
520
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 224 To the lord chancellor
521
To the marquis of Buckingham
522
To the marquis of Buckingham
523
To the marquis of Buckingham
525
To the lord chancellor
526
To the marquis of Buckingham
527
To the marquis of Buckingham
529
To the marquis of Buckingham
530
To the king ibid 240 To the marquis of Buckingham
532
To the lord chancellor
534
sending to his majesty his Novum Organum
535
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 244 Draught of a proclamation for a parliament re ferred to in the preceding letter
536
To the lord chancellor
541
To Sir Henry Wotton ibid 247 Lord of St Albans to Mr Matthew
542
To Mr Matthew believing his danger less than he found it
543
To Mr Matthew owning his impatient attention to do him service
544
To the lord chancellor
548
To the lord Chancellor ibid 255 To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 256 To the king
549
To the king
550
To the kings most excellent majesty
551
To the prince of Wales
552
To the king
553
To the marquis of Buckingham
554
A memorial for his majestys service ibid 263 To the marquis of Buckingham
556
To the marquis of Buckingham
557
To the king
558
To the lord St Alban
559
To the lord St Alban
560
VOL V
561
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 273 To the kings most excellent majesty
562
To the lord marquis of Buckingham high admiral of England
563
To Mr Matthew employing him to do a good office with a great man
571
To the lord Digly on his going to Spain
572
To Matthew ibid 280 An expostulation to the marquis of Buckingham573
573
To the lord St Allan
575
To the duke of Buckingham
577
To the lord St Allan ibid 285 To the duke of Buckingham
578
To the lord St Alban ibid 287 To the lord St Allan
579
To the lord St Allan
580
To the lord St Allan ibid 291 To the duke of Buckingham
581
To the lord treasurer Marllorough expostulating about his unkindness and injustice
582
To the king ibid 295 In answer to the foregoing ly king James
584
The bishops answer to the preceding letter
585
To the queen of Bohemia
587
A letter of the lord Bacon in French to the mar quis Fiat
588

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Page 154 - ... life, which nevertheless was, indeed, but the privilege of his order ; and the pity in the common people, which if it run in a strong stream, doth ever cast up scandal and envy, made it generally rather talked than believed that all was but the king's device. But howsoever it were, hereupon Perkin, that had offended against grace now the third time, was at the last proceeded with, and by commissioners of oyer and...
Page 165 - King being present, did put the case; that if God should take the King's two sons without issue, that , then the kingdom of England would fall to the King of Scotland, which might prejudice the monarchy of England. Whereunto the King himself replied ; that if that should be, Scotland would be but an accession to England, and not England to Scotland, for that the greater would draw; the less : and that it was a safer union for England than that of France. This passed as an oracle, and silenced those...
Page 185 - He advanced church-men: he was tender in the privilege of sanctuaries, though they wrought him much mischief. He built and endowed many religious foundations, besides his memorable hospital of the Savoy: and yet was he a great alms-giver in secret; which shewed,-that his works in public were dedicated rather to God's glory than his own.
Page 207 - And for your Lordship, perhaps you shall not find more strength and less encounter in any other. And if your Lordship shall find now, or at any time, that I do seek or affect any place whereunto any that is nearer unto your Lordship shall be concurrent, say then that I am a most dishonest man.
Page 94 - Lastly, she raised his thoughts with some present rewards, and farther promises ; setting before him chiefly the glory and fortune of a crown if things went well, and a sure refuge to her court, if the worst should fall. After such time as she thought he was perfect in his lesson, she began to cast with herself from what coast this blazing star should first appear, and at what time it must be upon the ho- } rizon of Ireland ; for there had the like meteor strong influence before.
Page 372 - If you take my lord Coke, this will follow; first, your Majesty shall put an overruling nature into an overruling place, which may breed an extreme ; next, you shall blunt his industries in matter of your finances, which seemeth to aim at another place ; and lastly, popular men are no sure mounters for your Majesty's saddle.
Page 297 - ... stand at a stay. And surely I may not endure, in public place, to be wronged without repelling the same to my best advantage to right myself. You are great, and therefore have the more enviers, which would be glad to have you paid at another's cost.
Page 284 - ... be popular, and not by any fashions of his own : he is thought somewhat general in his favours ; and his virtue of access is rather, because he is much abroad and in press, than that he giveth easy audience. He hasteneth to a mixture of both kingdoms and occasions, faster perhaps than policy will well bear.
Page 406 - ... disgrace upon slight grounds, and that sometimes untruly ; so that your reproofs or commendations are for the most part neglected and contemned ; when the censure of a judge, coming slow but sure, should be a brand to the guilty, and a crown to the virtuous.
Page 145 - ... blood should be spilt. The king, as soon as he heard of Perkin's flight, sent presently five hundred horse to pursue and apprehend him, before he should get either to the sea, or to that same little island called a sanctuary. But they came too late for the latter of these. Therefore all they could do, was to beset the sanctuary, and to maintain a strong watch about it, till the king's pleasure were further known.

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