The analogy of religion, natural and revealed, to the constitution and course of nature

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Page i - Probable evidence is essentially distinguished from demonstrative by this, that it admits of degrees; and of all variety of them, from the highest moral certainty, to the very lowest presumption. We cannot indeed say a thing is probably true upon one very slight presumption for it; because, as there may be probabilities on both sides of a question, there may be some against it: and though there be not, yet a slight presumption does not...
Page 299 - For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect.
Page 216 - ... like a city upon a hill, a standing memorial to the world of the duty which we owe our Maker; to call men continually, both by example and instruction, to attend to it, and by the form of religion ever before their eyes, remind them of the reality: to be the repository of the oracles of God; to hold up the light of revelation in aid to that of nature, and propagate it throughout all generations to the end of the world — the light of revelation considered here in no other view than as designed...
Page iv - ... absolute and formal obligation, in point of prudence and of interest, to act upon that presumption or low probability, though it be so low as to leave the mind in very great doubt which is the truth. For surely a man is as really bound in prudence to do what upon the whole appears, according to the best of his judgment, to be for his happiness, as what he certainly knows to be so.
Page 274 - For the Father judgeth no man, but hath committed all judgment unto the Son: That all men should honour the Son, even as they honour the Father. He that honoureth not the Son honoureth not the Father which hath sent him.
Page 60 - Turn you at my reproof; behold I will pour out my spirit upon you. I will make known my words unto you.
Page 453 - ... in general, there is in reality an universally acknowledged standard of it. It is that, which all ages and all countries have made profession of in public : it is that, which every man you meet, puts on the show of: it is that, which the primary and fundamental laws of all civil constitutions, over the face of the earth, make it their business and endeavour to enforce the practice of upon mankind : namely, justice, veracity, and regard to common good.
Page 122 - But going over the theory of virtue in one's thoughts, talking well, and drawing fine pictures, of it; this is so far from necessarily or certainly conducing to form a habit of it, in him who thus employs himself, that it may harden the mind in a contrary course, and render it gradually more insensible ; ie form a habit of insensibility to all moral considerations.
Page 253 - Nay we are not in any sort able to judge, whether it were to have been expected, that the revelation should have been committed to writing ; or left to be handed down, and consequently corrupted, by verbal tradition, and at length sunk under it, if mankind so pleased, and during such time as they are permitted, in the degree they evidently are, to act as they will.

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