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FOWLERS AND WELLS, PUBLISHERS, CLINTON HALL, 131 NASSAU STREET.

1851.

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Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1851, by

FOWLERS AND WELLS,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the

Southern District of New York.

STEREOTYPED BY WILLIAM J. BANER,

201 William Street.

PREFACE

TO THE ABRIDGED EDITION.

In the preface of the unabridged work, the author says, “The great object of the following Treatise is to exhibit several of the most important natural laws, and their relations and consequences, with a view to the improvement of education, and the regulation of individual and national conduct.

I confine my observations exclusively to man as he exists in the present world, and beg that, in perusing the subsequent pages, this explanation may be constantly kept in view. In consequence of forgetting it my language has occasionally been misapprehended, and my objects misrepresented. When I speak of man's highest interest, for example, I uniformly refer to man as he exists in this world; but as the same God presides over both the temporal and the eternal interests of the human race, it seems to me demonstrably certain that what is conducive to the one will in no instance impede the other, but will in general be favorable to it also. This work, however, does not directly embrace the interests of eternity. These belong to the department of theology, and demand a different line of investigation. I confine myself exclusively to philosophy.”

Says Professor Sedgwick, of Cambridge University, England, “If there be a superintending Providence, and if His will be manifested by general laws operating both on the physical and moral world, then must a violation of these laws be a violation of His will, and be pregnant with inevitable misery. Nothing can, in the end, be expedient for man, except it be subordinate to those laws which the Author of nature has thought fit to impress on his moral and physical creation.”

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