The Westminster Review.Volume II.July-October,1824

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Page 504 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished"?
Page 26 - But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts: and be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you with meekness and fear...
Page 189 - He was perhaps sixty years old ; yet his brow was not much furrowed, and his jet black hair was only grizzled, not whitened, by the advance of age. All his motions spoke strength unabated ; and, though rather undersized, he had very broad shoulders, was square-made, thin-flanked, and apparently combined in his frame muscular strength and activity ; the last somewhat impaired perhaps by years, but the first remaining in full vigour.
Page 26 - But and if ye suffer for righteousness' sake, happy are ye: and be not afraid of their terror, neither be troubled...
Page 24 - Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps: who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth : who, when he was reviled, reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not; but committed himself to him that judgeth righteously...
Page 256 - A vessel, in which a friend and some domestics of mine were embarked, was detained a few days ago, and released by order of your Highness. I have now to thank you ; not for liberating the vessel, which, as carrying a neutral flag, and being under British protection, no one had a right to detain ; but for having treated my friends with so much kindness while they were in your hands. " In the hope, therefore, that it may not be altogether displeasing to your Highness, I have requested the governor...
Page 269 - I must sleep now ;' upon which he laid down, never to rise again ! for he did not move hand or foot during the following twenty-four hours. His lordship appeared, however, to be in a state of suffocation at intervals, and had a frequent rattling in the throat ; on these occasions, I called Tita to assist me in raising his head, and I thought he seemed to get quite stiff. The rattling and...
Page 264 - Mavrocordatos is almost recalled by the new Government to the Morea (to take the lead I rather think), and they have written to propose to me, to go either to the Morea with him, or to take the general direction of affairs in this quarter with General Londos, and any other I may choose to form a council.
Page 256 - In the hope, therefore, that it may not be altogether displeasing to your highness, I have requested the governor of this place to release four Turkish prisoners, and he has humanely consented to do so. I lose no time, therefore, in sending them back, in order to make as early a return as I could for your courtesy on a late occasion.
Page 353 - Wolfgang arrived at Paris at the breaking out of the revolution. The popular delirium at first caught his enthusiastic mind, and he was captivated by the political and philosophical theories of the day: but the scenes of blood which followed shocked his sensitive nature, disgusted him with society and the world, and made him more than ever a recluse.

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