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SPECTATOR,

WITH INTRODUCTION AND NOTES BY

GEORGE A. AITKEN
AUTHOR OF " THE LIFE OF RICHARD STEELE,” ETC.

WITH EIGHT ORIGINAL PORTRAITS

AND EIGHT VIGNETTES

IN EIGHT VOLUMES

VOLUME THE THIRD

LONDON
JOHN C. NIMMO
NEW YORK: LONGMANS, GREEN, & co.

MDCCCXcvini

HARVARD
UNIVERSITY
LIBRARY

Printed by BALLANTYNE, Hanson & Co

At the Ballantyne Press

TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE

HENRY BOYLE, Esq.'

SIR,

P S the professed design of this work is

| to entertain its readers in general,

without giving offence to any particular person, it would be difficult

to find out so proper a patron for it as yourself, there being none whose merit is more universally acknowledged by all parties, and who has made himself more friends and fewer enemies. Your great abilities and unquestioned integrity in those high employments which you have passed

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i Henry Boyle, third and youngest son of Charles, Lord Clifford, became Chancellor of the Exchequer in March 1701, and held that post until February 1708, when he was made a Secretary. of State. He was Lord Treasurer of Ireland from 1704 to 1710, when he went out of office, but on the accession of George I. he was created Lord Carleton, and was made President of the Council. He died, unmarried, on March 14, 1725. Boyle aided Addison in the negotiations with Godolphin respecting the writing of the •Campaign'in 1705, and his life was written by Addison's cousin Budgell, in his · Memoirs of the Family of the Boyles.'

ave

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through, would not have been able to have raised you this general approbation, had they not been accompanied with that moderation in an high fortune, and that affability of manners which are so conspicuous through all parts of your life. Your aversion to any ostentatious arts of setting to show those great services which you have done the public, has not likewise a little contributed to that universal acknowledgment which is paid you by your country.

The consideration of this part of your character is that which hinders me from enlarging on those extraordinary talents which have given you so great a figure in the British Senate, as well as on that elegance and politeness which appear in your more retired conversation. I should be unpardonable if, after what I have said, I should longer detain you with an address of this nature; I cannot, however, conclude it without owning those great obligations which you have laid upon,

Sir,
Your most obedient, bumble Servant,

THE SPECTATOR.

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