To the Arctic by Canoe 1819-1821: The Journal and Paintings of Robert Hood, Midshipman with Franklin

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Oct 26, 1994 - History - 280 pages
When supplies ran out, the return trek across the Barrens became one of the most tragic incidents in the history of Arctic exploration. Robert Hood was one of those who perished on this trip. Weakened by starvation, he was shot through the head by a member of the party turned cannibal. A highly sensitive and educated man with a painter's eye for detail, Hood was an astute observer of the political and social ways of the North. The journal reveals his awareness, unusual in his time, of the adverse effects on Native peoples and their environment of the coming of the Europeans. Hood's paintings capture the beauty as well as the harshness of the North. His bird paintings in particular are of special artistic and historical interest.
 

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Contents

NARRATIVE OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF AN EXPEDITION ON DISCOVERY IN NORTH AMERICA
1
I Gravesend to York Factory
4
2 York Factory to Cumberland House
20
3 Cumberland House and Pasquia Hills
42
4 Account of the Cree Indians
70
5 The Buffalo Climate Aurora Borealis Magnetic Phenomena
90
6 Cumberland House to Fort Chipewyan
104
7 Fort Chipewyan to Fort Enterprize
122
8 Fort Enterprize to Point Lake
144
The Death of Hood
156
Commentary
166
The Men of the Expedition
189
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
207
INDEX
209
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