Birds of Texas: A Field Guide

Front Cover
Texas A&M University Press, 1994 - Nature - 280 pages
There are certain pilgrimages that must be made by the serious North American birder: Santa Ana in the lower Rio Grande Valley, Hawk Mountain, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Delaware Bay, the Everglades, High Island, Point Reyes, and Big Bend, to name a few. It is no accident that many of these ornithological shrines are located in Texas, which has the most diverse avifauna in North America north of Mexico. Texas comes by this enormous diversity honestly, with rugged mountains, vast deserts, lush semi-tropical woodlands, prairies, bayous, cedar brakes, thorn forests, and one of the richest temperate migration corridors in the world located along the western Gulf Coast.

Birds of Texas: A Field Guide provides an introduction and ready access to this spectacular variety. The text provides detailed information on identification, habitat preferences, voice, seasonal occurrence, abundance, and distribution. Maps show precisely where in the state the bird can be found. Photos of the bird in the field put the species in the proper visual context for identification; in fact, the photos for over half of the 622 species were taken in Texas. Texas is a unique region of the hemisphere, and its birdlife is an important part of what makes it special. This book will be useful to the beginner and the experienced birder alike.
 

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This is the most highly recommended Texas bird book around and deserves the acclaim. It's the most thorough and the best. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
Accounts of Species
11
Family Gaviidae Loons
13
Family Podicipedidae Grebes
15
Family Diomedeidae Albatrosses
17
StormPetrels
19
Family Phaethontidae Tropicbirds
20
Pelicans
22
Family Tytonidae BarnOwls
127
Family Caprimulgidae Goatsuckers
132
Family Apodidae Swifts
135
Hummingbirds
137
Family Trogonidae Trogons
143
Family Alcedinidae Kingfishers
144
Family Picidae Woodpeckers
145
Family Tyrannidae Flycatchers and Kingbirds
150

Cormorants
23
Anhingas
24
Frigatebirds
25
Family Ardeidae Herons Egrets and Bitterns
26
Ibises and Spoonbills
31
Storks
32
Family Phoenicopteridae Flamingos
33
Family Anatidae Ducks Geese and Swans
34
Family Cathartidae Vultures
52
Hawks Kites and Eagles
53
Caracaras and Falcons
65
Family Cracidae Chachalacas
69
Family Rallidae Rails Gallinules and Coots
73
Limpkins
77
Family Burhinidae Thickknees
78
Plovers
79
Oystercatchers
82
Stilts and Avocets
83
Jacanas
84
Jaegers Gulls and Terns
100
Family Columbidae Doves and Pigeons
117
Family Psittacidae Parrots and Parakeets
122
Family Cuculidae Cuckoos Roadrunners and Anis
125
Larks
161
Swallows and Martins
162
Jays Crows and Ravens
165
Chickadees and Titmice
169
Verdin
171
Nuthatches
172
Creepers
173
Wrens
174
Dippers
177
Kinglets Gnatcatchers and Thrushes
178
Thrashers and Mockingbirds
185
Pipits
188
Waxwings
189
SilkyFlycatchers
190
Shrikes
191
Starlings
192
Wood Warblers Tanagers Sparrows Blackbirds Orioles and Emberizine Finches
197
Old World Finches
248
House Sparrows
252
Photographers
255
References
263
Index
267
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

John H. Rappole is research coordinator at the Conservation and Research Center, National Zoological Park, Smithsonian Institution, in Front Royal, Virginia.Gene W. Blacklock was curator of natural history and coordinator for education programs at the Welder Wildlife Foundation in Sinton, Texas, for twenty years. He is currently a wildlife consultant living in Corpus Christi, Texas.

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