The Bottom Translation: Marlowe and Shakespeare and the Carnival Tradition

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Northwestern University Press, 1987 - Drama - 165 pages
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The Bottom Translation represents the first critical attempt at applying the ideas and methods of the great Russian critic, Mikhail Bakhtin, to the works of Shakespeare and other Elizabethans. Professor Kott uncovers the cultural and mythopoetic traditions underlying A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Tempest, Dr. Faustus, and other plays. His method draws him to interpret these works in the light of the carnival and popular tradition as it was set forth by Bakhtin. The Bottom Translation breaks new ground in critical thinking and theatrical vision and is an invaluable source of new ideas and perspectives. Included in this volume is also an extraordinary essay on Kurosawa's "Ran" in which the Japanese filmmaker recreates King Lear.

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The bottom translation: Marlowe and Shakespeare and the Carnival tradition

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Kott's Shakespeare, Our Contemporary (1964) can take much of the credit (or blame) for most radical interpretations of Shakespeare staged today. His newest collection of essays is not as revolutionary ... Read full review

Contents

The Bottom Translation
29
The Tempest or Repetition
69
The Aeneid and The Tempest
107
Appendix
133
The Cruel Webster
153
Index
161
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About the author (1987)

Jan Kott, (1914-2001) born in Warsaw, was a theater critic and theorist.

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