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APPROPRIATION BILL FOR 1949

HEARINGS

BEFORE THE

SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE
COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

UNITED STATES SENATE

EIGHTY-FIRST CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION

ON

H. R. 4046

AN ACT MAKING APPROPRIATIONS TO SUPPLY
DEFICIENCIES IN CERTAIN APPROPRIA-
TIONS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END-
ING JUNE 30, 1949, AND FOR

OTHER PURPOSES

Printed for the use of the Committee on Appropriations

UNITED STATES

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

90561

WASHINGTON : 1949

SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

KENNETH MCKELLAR, Tennessee, Chairman CARL HAYDEN, Arizona

STYLES BRIDGES, New Hampshire RICHARD B. RUSSELL, Georgia

CHAN GURNEY, South Dakota
ELMER THOMAS, Oklahoma

HOMER FERGUSON, Michigan
BURNET R. MAYBANK, South Carolina GUY CORDON, Oregon
ALLEN J. ELLENDER, Louisiana

CLYDE M. REED, Kansas
JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, Arkansas
A. WILLIS ROBERTSON, Virginia

EVERARD H. SMITH, Clerk

II

SECOND DEFICIENCY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1949

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

STATEMENTS OF MARK HOLLIS, ASSISTANT SURGEON GENERAL,

CHIEF ENGINEER; CARL E. SCHWOB, CHIEF, DIVISION OF WATER
POLLUTION CONTROL; ROY E. HARLOW, BUDGET AND FISCAL
OFFICER, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE; AND M. A. STEPHENS,
BUDGET OFFICER, FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY

Mr. HOLLIS. Mr. Chairman, I am appearing in support of the item

that appears on page 11 of House Document 93, or page 5, of the bill

in line 20.

carried a request for $658,000 and the House allowed $308,000. Restoration of the $350,000 is requested and the attached justification indicates by page and line where the restoration is desired and also makes some explanation of the necessity for requesting restoration.

After the House passed H. R. 4046, the President signed H. J. Res. 212 authorizing an additional appropriation of $1,500,000 for “Grants to States for services for crippled children,” Public Law 42. The President then submitted to the Senate a request for the appropriation, Senate Document 53. Justifications covering this item are in the hands of the committee staff.

Witnesses from the Public Health Service and the Children's Bureau are available for a call at the convenience of the committee. Sincerely yours,

J. DONALD KINGSLEY,

Acting Administrator.

SALARIES AND EXPENSES

(Estimate, $658,000)
(House hearings, pp. 414-419)

(P. 5, line 20)

(1) Page 5, line 20, strike out "$308,000” and insert in lieu thereof “$658,000," the estimate, or an increase of $350,000 in the appropriation.

House report (p. 4)

"Public Health Service.—Of the budget request of $658,000 for this activity, the committee is recommending $308,000 for the cost of pay increases under Public Law 900. The remaining $350,000 requested for water-pollution-control activities is denied. It does not appear to the committee that sufficient study has been given to this project with respect to the cooperation of the States and to the development of specific programs. Furthermore, while water-pollution study and control is desirable and necessary, the committee could not consider it an emergency item.”

Justification

It is extremely important that funds be provided now to implement the Water Pollution Control Act (Public Law 845, approved June 30, 1948), for the following reasons:

1. The program authorized by Public Law 845 covers five fiscal years beginning July 1, 1948, and ending June 30, 1953. Failure to provide funds for fiscal year 1949 will limit operations in fiscal year 1950 also and thus restrict the program for 2 of the 5 years of its life.

2. The 1950 budget as submitted by the President anticipated a supplemental appropriation in 1949 for this activity and is inadequate unless so supplemented.

3. The States have taken definite action during fiscal year 1949 in keeping with their responsibility under the act and in anticipation of like action by the Federal Government.

4. Some of the funds available for regular activities relating to water pollution have been spent at an accelerated rate in order to make a modest beginning on the program. It would be extremely difficult and wasteful to retrench at this time.

As to cooperation with the States in the development of specific programs, the Public Health Service has made great efforts to insure that the programs that have been placed into effect have the full concurrence, approval, and wholehearted cooperation of State water-pollution-control authorities of the Nation. This was accomplished by individual conferences, correspondence, and by holding a series of five regional meetings through the country in December 1948 and January 1949, at which representatives of every State water-pollution-control authority and of allied State agencies having an interest or responsibility in water-pollution control were present. Representatives of these meetings discussed not only principles but details of programs that are now in effect. The extensive cooperative planning with the States has resulted in initiating the development of comprehensive programs for well over 300 of the major rivers in the Nation. This mutual program emphasizes complete utilization of existing data already available in States and provides for supplementation only where gaps in information are found to occur.

Mr. HOLLIS. This is in support of the stream-pollution funds portion of that total item. This item was requested under authorization of the Water Pollution Control Act, Public Law 845, passed in the closing hours of the last Congress. These are the first funds requested by the Public Health Service under the several financial provisions of the act.

The act itself directs the Surgeon General to develop comprehensive programs for pollution control considering all allied water users; provides for research in the field of industrial wastes treatment with emphasis on those wastes not susceptible to known methods of treatment; instructs the Public Health Service to furnish technical assistance to States; provides grants-in-aid to State and interstate pollution agencies and authorizes loans to cities under specified conditions for constructing remedial works.

In recognition of the committee's time, I will not dwell on the acuteness of the stream pollution problem of the wide areas of the United States. Printed testimony covering congressional hearings preceding passage of Public Law 845 defines the problem very well. Suffice it to say that excessive pollution of our surface waters is adversely affecting the use of streams for public-water supplies, for recreational and agricultural purposes, for the propagation of fish and wildlife, and has resulted in closing vast areas for the production of marketable shellfish,

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM

The program authorized by Public Law 845 covers five fiscal years beginning July 1, 1948. This item represents the only funds requested for this year of the act.

Senator FERGUSON. There are only a few months left in this year? Mr. HOLLIS. That is true, sir.

Senator FERGUSON. How much would you be able to use between now and July 1?

Mr. HOLLIS. There are two or three problems in that connection and I would like to get them in order.

Senator FERGUSON. It was so short a time I wondered why we could not put it in the regular bill and start it July 1st?

Mr. Hollis. We had proceeded on the apportionment of our regular funds and that is the difficulty that we find ourselves in.

Mr. STEPHENS. I will give you just a little explanation, gentlemen. When this law was passed the Surgeon General proceeded to implement it as best he could from different funds from the salaries and expenses of the Surgeon General. In the 1950 bill, which you are considering, there is a special appropriation.

Senator FERGUSON. That is what I understood.

Mr. STEPHENS. This program has been under way. They have gone ahead as best as they could get organized with whatever the Surgeon General could spare.

EXPENDITURES TO DATE FROM OTHER APPROPRIATIONS

The CHAIRMAN. How much have you spent on it up to date?

Mr. HOLLIS. Through April 30 we have expended $129,384 which represents 59 positions.

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