Once Upon a Time in Paradise: Canadians in the Golden Age of Hollywood

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Dundurn, 2003 - Performing Arts - 319 pages

When sound arrived in Hollywood in the late 1920s, Canadians were already holding some of the most important roles in the motion picture industry. Louis B. Mayer, from New Brunswick, was boss at MGM; Jack Warner, from Ontario, was head of Warner Bros. Studio; and Mack Sennett, from Quebec, was still King of Comedy.

Canadians like Mary Pickford, Marie Dressler, and Norma Shearer moved easily from silents to talkies - this illustrious trio won the first three Academy Awards for Best Actress.

Canadians arriving in sunny California in the 1930s and 1940s were principally actors, including Yvonne de Carlo, Walter Pidgeon, Ruby Keeler, and many others. You will be amazed at the Canadian influence on Hollywood's Golden Age.

 

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Contents

Prologue
9
Bobby Breen
35
Jack Carson
57
Berton Churchill
79
Fifi DOrsay
97
Yvonne De Carlo
121
Walter Huston
143
Ruby Keeler
165
David Manners
189
Walter Pidgeon
231
John Qualen
251
Ned Sparks
267
Jack Warner
287
Epilogue
311
Copyright

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Page 32 - Blue will be a star there just as he was on earth to all those who had the good fortune to know him and work with him on this earth.

About the author (2003)

During the Second World War, Charles Foster visited Hollywood on leave and established lifelong friendships with many of the Canadians he now writes about. Later, he wrote comedy material for many TV shows and for comedians like Bob Hope and Jack Benny. His first book, Stardust and Shadows, drew critical acclaim.

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