Mosquitoes: How They Live; how They Carry Disease; how They are Classified; how They May be Destroyed

Front Cover
McClure, Phillips, 1901 - Mosquitoes - 241 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 128 - C.fasciatus — serves as the intermediate host for the parasite of yellow fever. 2. Yellow fever is transmitted to the non-immune individual by means of the bite of the mosquito that has previously fed on the blood of those sick with this disease.
Page 57 - The breeding-places seemed to be segregated pools at the end of the pond (the pond itself contained fish) and post-holes and excavations. These last were numerous, as many buildings were going up. The following practical measures were adopted: (1) Extermination of all the Anopheles found in houses by a party of men sent out for the purpose, and this was followed by a systematic introduction of screens in windows and doors ; (2) Filling in of the smaller breeding-places and...
Page 129 - ... 8. Yellow fever is not conveyed by fomites, and hence disinfection of articles of clothing, bedding, or merchandise, supposedly contaminated by contact with those sick with this disease, is unnecessary. 9. A house may be said to be infected with yellow fever only when there are present within its walls contaminated mosquitoes capable of conveying the parasite of this disease.
Page 129 - ... 5. Yellow fever can also be experimentally produced by the subcutaneous injection of blood taken from the general circulation during the first and second days of this disease.
Page 99 - Oulex pungens as is the egg. It differs in structure, in its food habits, and in its customary position- so markedly that it can at once be distinguished with the utmost ease. The larva of Culex, it will be remembered, comes to the surface of the water to breathe, thrusting its breathing tube through the surface layer and holding its body at an angle of about 45 degrees with the surface of the water. While in this position its mouth parts are in motion and it is taking into its alimentary canal such...
Page 129 - ... 9. A house may be said to be infected with yellow fever only when there are present within its walls contaminated mosquitoes capable of conveying the parasite of this disease. 10. The spread of yellow fever can be most effectually controlled by measures directed to the destruction of mosquitoes and the protection of the sick against the bites of these insects. 11. While the mode of propagation of yellow fever has now been definitely determined, the specific cause of this disease remains to be...
Page 56 - About the same time mosquitoes that had bitten a patient suffering with malaria in Rome were sent to Liverpool, and permitted to bite a son of Dr. Manson, who had never been in a malarious country since he was a child. These mosquito bites were promptly followed by a well-marked infection of the double tertian type. Many other experiments have likewise indicated the transmission of malaria by...
Page 84 - The interesting point was that in every leaf examined there were wrigglers, varying in size from an eighth to a quarter of an inch in length.
Page 241 - I strongly suspect that the type of ferruginosusis a rubbed example of Anopheles crucians, which was described from the same locality. Say's description of his Culex quinquefasciatus agrees very well with, the species which I have identified as Culex impiger Walker. maculipennis Meigen. I strongly suspect that this European form is identical with our Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say, but this point can not be settled definitely at present, owing to the lack of any European specimens for comparison with...
Page 40 - After enumerating these and other examples of the achievements of the gnat and mosquito tribe, Kirby says, "It is not therefore incredible that Sapor, King of Persia, should have been compelled to raise the siege of Nisibis by a plague of gnats, which attacked his elephants and beasts of burden, and so caused the rout of his army...

Bibliographic information