Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason

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Vintage Books, 1988 - History - 299 pages
Michel Foucault examines the archeology of madness in the West from 1500 to 1800 - from the late Middle Ages, when insanity was still considered part of everyday life and fools and lunatics walked the streets freely, to the time when such people began to be considered a threat, asylums were first built, and walls were erected between the "insane" and the rest of humanity.

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Review: Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason

User Review  - Tara - Goodreads

I read this before MF's lectures were published. Madness is an historical construction and MF is using it to illustrate the "epistemic shift" that occurs in the 16th and 17th centuries I enjoyed ... Read full review

Review: Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason

User Review  - Jeremy - Goodreads

It's a bit drier and it lacks the really sharp style of Discipline and Punish, especially in the beginning, but his observations and analysis, coupled with his rigorous historical method are still ... Read full review

Contents

Stultifera Navis
7
The Great Confinement
32
The Insane
59
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Michel Foucault was born in Poitiers, France, in 1926. He lecturerd in universities throughout the world; served as director at the Institut Francais in Hamburg, Germany and at the Institut de Philosophi at the Faculte des Lettres in the University of Clermont-Ferrand, France; and wrote frequently for French newspapers and reviews. At the time of his death in 1984, he held a chair at France's most prestigious institutions, the College de France.

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