Oxf. Hist. Soc, Volume 32

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Society at Clarendon Press, 1896 - Oxford (England)

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Page 357 - ... of our especial grace, certain knowledge,- and mere motion, have given and granted, and by these presents, for us, our heirs and successors, do...
Page 278 - He was a lovely person, had a virtuous and excellent lady that brought him great riches, and a second dukedom in Scotland. He was Master of the Horse, General of the King his father's army, Gentleman of the Bedchamber, Knight of the Garter, Chancellor of Cambridge ; in a word, had...
Page 358 - ... or provided, or any other matter, cause or thing whatsoever to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding.
Page 355 - Know ye therefore that we of our especial grace, certain knowledge, and mere motion...
Page 356 - ... plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered unto, defend and be defended in all courts...
Page 368 - Third, he would unquestionably have rivalled Ludlow, or Algernon Sydney, in their attachment to a commonwealth. His person was tall and thin, his countenance expressive of ardour and impetuosity, as were all his movements. Over his whole figure, and even his dress, an air of puritanism reminded the beholder of the sectaries under Cromwell, rather than a young man of quality in an age of refinement and elegance. He possessed stentorian lungs and a powerful voice, always accompanied with violent gesticulation....
Page 389 - Kingdom which shall be u*ed in the printing of any books in the Latin, Greek, Oriental, or Northern languages within the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, or...
Page 339 - He usually made excursions, in the long vacations, into various parts of the kingdom, most commonly taking with him, for company and improvement, one or more young gentlemen of fortune in his college, at the request, and with the approbation, of their parents. He was himself, in every respect, a gentleman, and a man of refined good breeding. You might see this in every part of his conversation. At evening, upon such journeys, he would, a little before bed-time, desire his young pupils to indulge...
Page 30 - Rex omnibus ad quos, etc., salutem. Sciatis, quod de gracia nostra speciali concessimus et licenciam dedimus, pro nobis et heredibus nostris, quantum in nobis est...
Page 30 - In cuius rei testimonium has litteras nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud Westmonasterium, vicesimo tercio die Maii anno regni nostri nono.

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