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CONTENTS.

CHAPTER II. - REPRESENTATIVE SELECTIONS.

1. Versions of the Bible; Notes on the Versions; State of the Language
in the Latter Part of the Fourteenth Century; 2. The Vision of Piers Plough-
man; Notes on the Selection from Piers Ploughman: 3. Sir John Mande-
ville; Notes on Selection; 4. Geoffrey Chaucer – Canterbury Tales; Notes
on the Clerkes Tale; 5. Edmund Spenser — The Faerie Queen; Notes on
the Selections; 6. Richard Hooker — Ecclesiastical Polity; Notes on the
Selections; 7. William Shakespeare - Julius Cæsar; Notes on Julius Cæsar;
8. John Milton - Samson Agonistes; Notes on Samson Agonistes; 9. Joseph
Addison - Spectator; Notes on Selections; 10. Alexander Pope – The
Rape of the Lock; Notes on The Rape of the Lock; 11. William Cowper -
The Task; Notes on the Selections from The Task; 12. Alfred Tennyson -
Elaine; Notes on Elaine; 13. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - Hiawatha,
Notes on the Selections from Hiawatha.

CHAPTER I. - FORMATION AND GROWTH OF LANGUAGE.

$1. Nature of Language, expressing Thought, social, through Articulate

Sound; 82. Its Elements, (1) Thought, (2) Person, (3) Matter of Thought;
83. Matter Element, (1) Subject, (2) Attribute; $ 4. Pronominal Element;
$5. Thought Element, Negation, Moods; $ 6. Modifying Elements; $ 7.
Notion Words distinguished by Forms; $ 8. Formative Elements - Form
Words; $ 9. Language Articulate — Interjectional and Onomatopoetic
Theories; § 10. Languages distinguished as Monosyllabic, Agglutinative,
and Inflectional; $ 11. Language ever changing.

CHAPTER II. – DEPARTMENTS OF LANGUAGE AND LITERA-

TURE.

CHAPTER IX.- PROSODY.

$ 51. Kinds; $ 52. Alliteration; § 53 Rhyme; $ 54. Rhythm; $ 55.
Stanza; $ 56. Sonnet; $ 57. Cæsura.

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS WORK.

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A.-S. aug.

.

.

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.

.

adj. stands for adjective.
act.

active.
Anglo-Saxon.

augmentative. aut.

auxiliary. of.

com pare. Ch.

Chaucer. comp.

compound. compar. comparative. conj.

conjunction. C. T..

Canterbury Tales. D.

Dutch. Dan.

Danish. dat.

dative. def.

definitive. dem.

demonstrative. der.

derived, derivative. dim.

diminutive.

for example. Eng. England, English. F. Q.

Faerie Queene. fem.

feminine. freg.

frequentative. fut.

future. gen.

genitive Ger.

German. Gloss.. Glossary. Goth.

Gothic. Gr.

Greek. Heb.

Hebrew i. e.

that is. imp.

imperative. imperf. imperfect. ind.

indicative. inf.

infinitive. int.

interjection. i. q.

Ir. stands for Irish.
Ital.

Italian.
Lat.

Latin. m., masc. masculine. mid.

middle. n.

noun, note. neut.

neuter. N. F..

Norman French. nom.

nominative. 0. Eng. Old English. obj.

objective. P. L.

Paradise Lost. part.

participle. pass.

passive. pers.

person. plu

plural. poet.

poetical. pos.

possessive. prep.

preposition. pres.

present. pret.

preterit. pron.

pronoun.

which see. R. L.. Rape of the Lock. S. A.

Samson Agonistes. Sans.

Sanskrit. Sax.

Saxon. sing.

singular. Sp.

Spanish. sup.

superlative. syn.

synonym. term.

termination. V.

verb. V. n.

verbal noun. v.i.

verb intransitive. verb transitive,

e.8

.

9.0.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

the same as.

OCT.

verbe.

ENGLISH LITERATURE.

PART I.

HISTORY AND SELECTIONS.

CHAPTER I.

ORIGIN AND AFFINITIES.

1. The most advanced investigations of philological science significantly point to an original unity of race and of language; and the Biblical narrative of the dispersion of the human family, and of the contemporaneous confusion of human speech, is the most trustworthy theory of race and dialect that the science of language and of literature, at its present stage, can propose to itself.

According to that narrative, a few centuries after the Deluge, the race of man, that up to that time had been kept together in the use of the same language, broke asunder, to seek in families or in larger tribal communities separate abodes for themselves, and in the separation framed to themselves separate dialects. This was the great historical epoch of the dispersion of the race and of the confusion of speech.

Whatever may have been the particular dialect spoken before the dispersion, whether more or less developed, it was among the necessities of things that, in a few cen

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