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INDEX.

The figures refer to the pages.

Abstract affixes, 478.
Abstracts defined, 434.
Acatalectic verse, 499.
Accentuation, 469-471; governing
principles, 470, 471.
Addison, Joseph, 276; selections from
the Spectator, 276-297.
Affixes, 475-486; prefixes, suffixes,
475; vernacular, Latin or French,
Greek, 475, 476; significant or eu-
phonic, 476; orthoepic or euphonic
affixes, 477, 478; significant, 478-
486; concrete and abstract, 478; of
quantity, property, and relation,
478-480; grammatical and dis-
criminative, 480-482; prefixes,
482-484; suffixes, 484-486; con-
cretes, 484; abstracts, 484, 485; ad-
jectives, 485, 486; verbs, 486; ad-
verbs, 486.

Agglutinative languages, 439.
Alliteration, 497, 498.

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Comedy, 517, 518.
Concretes, 434.
Concrete affixes, 478.
Consonants, system of, 450.
Conditional mood expressed by past
tense, 20, n. on ver. 7.
Confusion of tongues and dispersion
of race, 1, 2.
Cowper, William, 322; selections
from the Task, 323-339.
Dialects, rise and spread, explained, 2.
Digraphs in English, 459, 460.
Diphthongs, consonant, 461.
Discriminative affixes, 481, 482.
Dramatic literature, 517, 518.
Dactyl, 500.

Deliberative orators enumerated, 505,
506.

Derivation of words, 472-494; modes,
473; Grimm's Law, 474; by com-
position, 475; by affixes, 475-486;
by internal change, 486, 487; by
change of use, 487-492; change of
meaning, 487, 488; change of gram-
matical use,
488.
Elaine, 341-377.
Elegiac stanza, 501.
Encyclopædias, 513.

English language, a member of the
Teutonic branch of the Indo-
European family of languages, 8;
its rise, 8-10; state at end of
fourteenth century, 23.
Euphonic affixes, 477, 478.
Faerie Queene, selections from, 92-
127.

Fiction, 514-516.
Foot in prosody, 499.

Form-words, their origin in lan-
guage, 434; enumerated, 437.
Formative elements of language,

436.

Gay's stanza, 501.

Geneva version of the Bible, 11.

Gibbs, Professor, his list of pronom-
inal elements, 431, 432.
Grammatical affixes, 480, 481.
Greek, a member of the Indo-Euro-
pean family of languages, 7.
Grimm's Law, 474.
Hamitic languages, 7.
Herder, on origin of language, 429.
Hiawatha, 379-426.
History, 507-509; historians enumer-
ated, 507, 508; biographers, 509.
Hooker, Richard, 133; selection
from his Ecclesiastical Polity, 133-
140.

Hypercatalectic verse, 499.
Iambus, 500.

Illyrian, a member of the Indo-Euro-
pean family of languages, 7.
Imperative mood in third person, 18,
n. on ver. 1.
Indo-European family of languages,

6.

Inflectional class of languages, 6,
439.

Inflections in English language at
end of fourteenth century, 23.
Intensive prefixes, 482.
Interjectional theory of the origin of
language, 3, 4, 437.

Iranian, a member of the Indo-Euro-
pean family of languages, 6.
Italic, a member of the Indo-Euro-
pean family of languages, 7.
Judicial orators enumerated, 504.
Jutes, invaders of England, 9.
King James' version of the Bible, 11.
Langland, author of Piers Plough-
man, 25.
Language, its origin, 3; the three
classes of primitive elements, ob-
ject - elements, thought - elements,
and person - elements, 4, 5, 428-
430; primitively monosyllabic for
the most part, 5, 439; progress to
agglutinative stage, and to inflec-
tional, 6, 439; ever changing, 440-
442; its departments, 443, 444.
Latin language, its relationship to
the English, 9.

Literature, its departments, 443, 444.
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 378;
his Hiawatha, 379-426.
Mandeville, Sir John, 42; selection

from his travels, 43-47.
Measure in prosody, 499; monome-
ters, dimeters, trimeters, tetrame-
ters, pentameters, hexameters, etc.,
499.

Metaphysical writers enumerated,
511, 512.

Migrations of the human race, 2, 3.
Milton, John, 226; his Samson
Agonistes, 227–271.

Monosyllabic languages, 439.
Müller, Professor Max, quoted on
agglutinative languages, 439.
Northmen,invaders of England, 9, 10.
Notes on Versions of the Bible, 18-
23; on Piers Ploughman, 31-42; on
Sir John Mandeville's travels, 47-
50; the Clerkes Tale, 51-92; the
Faerie Queene, 128-133; Richard
Hooker, 140, 141; Julius Cæsar,
212-226; Samson Agonistes, 272-
276; Addison's Spectator, 297-299;
the Rape of the Lock, 320-322; the
Task, 339, 340; Elaine, 377-388;
Hiawatha, 427.
Notion-words, 434.
Onomatopoetic theory of the origin
of language, 4, 437, 438.
Oratory, 503-506; pulpit oratory
503; forensic, judicial, 504; delib-
erative, 505, 506.
Orthoepy, 447-465.
Orthography of the English lan-
guage at end of fourteenth cen-
tury, 23; its character, 456-464.
Ottava Rima, 501.
Pæon, 500.

Periodical literature, 512
Phrases, 435.

Phthongal and aphthongal elements,
how distinguished, 458.
Physical science, writers in, 512.
Piers Ploughman, 25.
Poetry, 519-522; departments, di-
dactic, lyric, epic, 519.
Pope, Alexander, 299; his Rape of
the Lock, 300-320.
Prefixes, 482-484; privatives, rela-
tives, intensives, 482.
Privative prefixes, 482.
Pronominal elements of speech, 430-
432; their early origin, 430-431;
enumerated, 431, 432.
Property affixes, 479.
Prosody, 497-502; defined,497; kinds
of poetic form, 497.
Pulpit orators enumerated, 503.
Punctuation, 495, 496; classes of
points, 495, 496.

Quantity affixes, 478; orthograph-
ical indications of long and short
quantity, 457, 458.
Rape of the Lock, 300-320.

Relation affixes, 479.
Relative prefixes, 482.
Rhyme, 497, 498; perfect, imperfect,
498; successive, alternate, inter-
rupted, 498; single, double, triple,
498.

Rhymes royal, 501.
Rhythm, 497, 498-500.
Samson Agonistes, 227-271.
Sanskrit, a member of the Indo-Eu-
ropean family of languages, 6.
Saxons, invaders of England, 9.
Scandinavian, a member of the Teu-
tonic branch of Indo-European
family of languages, 7.
Scientific discourse, 510-513; theolo-
gy, 510, 511.

Semitic languages, inflected, 7.
Shakespeare, William, 141; æsthet-

ic character of his Julius Cæsar,
142-145; the Tragedie of Julius
Cæsar, 145-212.
Significant affixes, 478-486.
Slavic, a member of the Indo-Euro-
pean family of languages, 7.
Sonnet, 501.

Speech, origin of, 3; its internal
principle, thought to be communi-
cated, 3; interjectional theory, 3;
onomatopoetic theory, 4; defined
as the communication of thought
by means of articulate sound, 428;
starts from thought, is social, and
has articulate sound as its medium,
428; its elements, matter, person-
ality, thought - element, 428, 429;
how originated, 429.
Spenser, Edmund, 92; his Faerie
Queene, 92.

Spenserian stanza, 501.
Stanza, 500, 501.
Syllabication, 466-468; orthoepic,
etymologic, and orthographic, 467;
governing principles. 468.

Tragedy, 517, 518.
Trochee, 500.

Tyndale, William, translator of the
Bible, 11.

Typography, influence on orthogra-
phy, 462, 463.

Task, the, selections from, 323-339.
Tennyson, Alfred, 340; his Elaine,
341-377.

Teutonic, a member of the Indo-Eu-

ropean family of languages, 7;
its contributions to the English,
9, 10.

Theological writers enumerated, 510,
511.

Thought element in speech, its ori-
gin, 432; stages of progress, 433;
its modifications, 433.

Unity of race and of language,
Biblical narrative, 1; evidence in
resemblances found in the earliest
dialects, 7.
Versions of the Bible, 11.
Vision of Piers Ploughman, 25; au-
thor, date, character, and design,
popularity, 25, 26; selection from,
26-31.

Vowels, rise of, 446-450.
Words, the first, names of objects, 4;
monosyllables, 439; formed on any
identification of sound with object,
438; formation of words, 472-494;
modes, 473; change in meaning,
487; in grammatical use, 488; ad-
mission of new words, 489; gov-
erning principles of admission,
new needs, 489; euphemism, 489;
emphasis, 490; parsimony, 491;
euphony, 491; discrimination, 491;
number in English vocabulary,
493.

Wycliffe, John, translator of the
Bible, 11.

THE END.

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