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28. Singular Properties of the Ellipsoid

AND ASSOCIATED SURFACES OF THE Nth DEGREE.

By the Rev. G. F. CHILDE, M.A.
Mathematical Professor in the South African College.

152 pp. (1861). 8vo.. boards. 108. 6d. As the title of this volume indicates, its object is to develope peculiarities in the Ellipsoid ; and further, to establish analogous properties in unlimited congeneric series of which this remarkable surface is a constituent. 29. Senate-House Mathematical Problems.

WITH SOLUTIONS.
1848-51. By FERRERS and JACKSON. 8vo. 158. 6d.
1848-51. (RIDERS). By JAMESON. 8vo. 78. 6d.
1854. By WALTON and MACKENZIE. 8vo. 10s. 6d.
1857. By CAMPION and WALTON: 8vo. 88. 6d.

1860. By ROUTH and WATSON. Crown 8vo. 78. 6d. The above books contain Problems and Examples which have been set in the Cambridge Senate-house Examinations at various periods during the last twelve years, together with Solutions of the same. The Solutions are in all cases given either by the Examiners themselves or under their sanction.

30. A Collection of Mathematical
Problems and Examples,

WITH ANSWERS.
By H. A. MORGAN, M.A.

Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge.

190 pp. (1858). Crown 8vo. 68. 6d. This book contains a number of problems, chiefly elementary, in the Mathematical subjects usually read at Cambridge. They have been selected from the papers set during late years at Jesus College. Very few of them are to be met with in other collections, and by far the larger number are due to some of the most distinguished Mathematicians in the University

31. Mathematical Tracts ON THE LUNAR AND PLANETARY THEORIES, FIGURE

OF THE EARTH, THE UNDULATORY THEORY OF
OPTICS, &c.
By the ASTRONOMER ROYAL, G. B. AIRY, M.A.
Fourth Edition. 400 pp. (1858). 8vo. 158.

. Cambridge and London.

14

CAMBRIDGE CLASS BOOKS

32. Theory of Errors of Observations and

the Combination of Observations. By the ASTRONOMER ROYAL, G. B. AIRY, M.A.

103 pp. (1861). Crown. 8vo. 68. 6d. In order to spare astronomers and observers in natural philosophy the confusion and loss of time which are produced by referring to the ordinary treatises embracing both branches of Probabilities, the author has thought it desirable to draw up this work, relating only to Errors of Observation, and to the rules derivable from the consideration of these Errors, for the Combination of the Results of Observations. The Author has thus also the advantage of entering somewhat more fully into several points of interest to the observer, than can possibly be done in a General Theory of Probabilities. 33. The Construction of Wrought Iron

Bridges.
EMBRACING THE PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF THE
PRINCIPLES OF MECHANICS TO WROUGHT-IRON

GIRDER-WORK.
By J. HERBERT LATHAM, M.A., Civil Engineer.

“The great merit of this book is that it deals with practice more than theory. All the calculations in the book connected with the strength of girders are based upon their actual application which abounds in practical investigations into girder-work in all its bearings, and will be welcomed as one of the most valuable contributions yet made to this important branch of engineering.—ATHENÆUM.

34. History of the Progress of The

Calculus of Variations
DURING THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

By I. TODHUTNER, M.A.
Fellow and Principal Mathematical Lecturer of St. John's Coll. Camb.

It is of importance that those who wish to cultivate any subject may be able to ascertain what results have already been obtained, and thus reserve their strength for difficulties which have not yet been conquered. And theşe who merely desire to ascertain the present state of a subject without any purpose of original investigation will often find that the study of the past history of that subject assists them materially in obtaining a sound and extensive knowledge of the condition which it has attained. The Author has endeavoured in this work to ascertain distinctly what has been effected in the Progress of the Calculus, and to form some estimate of the manner in which it has been effected : accordingly, unless the contrary is distinctly stated, it may be assumed that any treatise or memoir relating to the Calculus of Variations which is described in this work has undergone thorough examination and study.

Macmillan and Co.

35. Help to Latin Grammar.

WITH EASY EXERCISES, BOTH ENGLISH AND LATIN,

QUESTIONS AND VOCABULARY.

By J. WRIGHT, M.A. Head Master of Sutton Coldfield School, 175 pp. (1855). Crown 8vo. cloth. 48. 6d. “This book aims at helping the learner to overstep the threshold difficulties of the Latin Grammar; and never was there a better aid offered alike to teacher and scholar in that arduous pass. The style is at once familiar and strikingly simple and lucid; and the explanations precisely hit the difficulties, and thoroughly explain them. It will also much facilitate the acquirement of English Grammar.”—ENGLISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATION.

.

36. The Seven Kings of Rome. A FIRST LATIN READING BOOK, ABRIDGED FROM LIVY,

BY THE OMISSION OF DIFFICULT PASSAGES, WITH NOTES AND INDEX.

By J. WRIGHT, M.A. Second Edition. 138 pp. (1857). Fcap. 8vo. cloth. 38.

This work is intended to supply the pupil with an easy Construing-book, which may, at the same time, be made the vehicle for instructing him in the rules of grammar and principles of composition. These branches of the study of Latin seem to the author to have hitherto been kept too much apart. Boys have construed their Delectus, or Eutropius, or Nepos, and have gone elsewhere for their grammatical exercises. Nor can this be wondered at. An educated man must feel positively ashamed of taking his pupils away from our good English authors, and setting before him instead a Delectus or Eutropius. He therefore skims over them as lightly, and escapes from them as quickly as possible, and has recourse for his composition lesson to one of the many exercise-books which swarm from our educational press. To remedy these evils this book has been published. Here Livy tells his own pleasant stories in his own pleasant words. What is omitted, is that which no one can wish à beginner to learn, and which may be better learnt elsewhere. Let Livy be the master to teach a boy Latin, not some English collector of sentences, and he will not be found a dull one. Cambridge and London.

16

CAMBRIDGE CLASS BOOKS

- The

28. 6d.

37. Vocabulary and Exercises on

Seven Kings of Rome. '

94 pp. (1857). Crown 8vo. cloth. The Vocabulary is published apart from the Text in order to suit the views of those who prefer their pupils to consult a general dictionary, but it may also be had bound together with the " SEVEN KINGS OF ROME," if preferred. As the aim of the Text is to teach the elements of grammar, so the Exercises are intended to test the pupil's knowledge of grammar. Indeed there is hardly an ordinary Latin construction which is not illustrated in the text, explained in the notes, and proved in the exercises.

38. Hellenica. A First Greek Reading Book. FROM DIODORUS AND THUCYDIDES. WITH VOCABULARY.

By J. WRIGHT, M.A.

Author of “A Latin Grammar." Second Edition. 150 pp. (1851). Fcap. 8vo. cloth. 38. 6d.

In the last twenty chapters of this volume, Thucydides sketches the rise and progress of the Athenian Empire in so clear a style and in such simple language, that the author doubts whether any easier or more instructive passages can be selected for the use of the pupil who is commencing Greek.

28. 6d.

39. A First Latin Construing Book.

By EDWARD THRING, M.A.

Head Master of Uppingham School.

104 pp. (1855). Fcap. 8vo. This Construing Book is drawn up on the same sort of graduated scale as the Author's English Grammar. Passages out of the best Latin Poets are gradually built up into their perfect shape. The few words altered, or inserted as the passages go on, are printed in Italics. It is hoped by this plan that the learner, whilst acquiring the rudiments of language, may store his mind with good poetry and a good vocabulary.

Macmillan and Co.

40. Juvenal.

WITH ENGLISH NOTES.

108. 6d.

BY JOHN E. B. MAYOR, M.A.
Fellow and Classical Lecturer of St. John's College, Cambridge.

464 pp. (1854). Crown 8vo. cloth. “A School edition of Juvenal, which, for really ripe scholarship, extensive acquaintance with Latin literature, and familiar knowledge with Continental criticism, ancient and modern, is unsurpassed, we do not say among English School-books, but among English editions generally.”EDINBURGH REVIEW.

41. Cicero's Second Philippic.

WITH ENGLISH NOTES.
By JOHN E. B. MAYOR, M.A.
168 pp. 1861). Fcp. 8vo. cloth.

58. The Text is that of Halm's 2nd edition (Leipsig, Weidmann, 1858), with some corrections from Madvig's 4th Edition (Copenhagen, 1858). Halm's Introduction has been closely translated, with some additions. His notes have been curtailed, omitted, or enlarged, at discretion; passages to which he gives a bare reference, are for the most part printed at length; for the Greek extracts an English version has been substituted. A large body of notes, chiefly grammatical and historical, has been added from various sources. A list of books useful to the student of Cicero, a copious Argument, and an Index to the introduction and notes, complete the book.

42. Sallust. WITH ENGLISH NOTES. By C. MERIVALE, B.D.

Author of "A History of Rome,” &c. Second Edition.

172 pp. (1858). Fcap. 8vo. 48. 6d. “This School edition of Sallust is precisely what the School edition of a Latin author ought to be. No useless words are spent in it, and no words that could be of use are spared. The text has been carefully collated with the best editions. It is printed in a large bold type, which manifests a just regard for the young eyes that are to work upon

it: under the text there flows through every page a full current of extremely well-selected annotations.”—THE EXAMINER. The CATILINAand JUGURTHAmay be had separately, price

28. 6d. each, bound in cloth. Cambridge and London.

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