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CAMBRIDGE CLASS BOOKS

15. A Treatise on Attractions, La Place's Functions, and the Figure of the Earth.

By J. H. PRATT, M.A. Archdeacon of Calcutta, late Fellow of Gonville and Caius College,

Cambridge.

Second Edition. Crown 8vo. 126 pp. (1861). cloth. 68. 6d.

In the present Treatise the author has endeavoured to supply the want of a work on a subject of great importance and high interest-La Place's Coefficients and Functions and the calculation of the Figure of the Earth by means of his remarkable analysis. No student of the higher branches of Physical Astronomy should be ignorant of Laplace's analysis and its result"a calculus,” says Airy, “the most singular in its nature and the mest powerful in its application that has ever appeared.”

16. Dynamics of A System of Rigid

Bodies.

WITH NUMEROUS EXAMPLES.

By EDWARD JOHN ROUTH, M.A.
Fellow and Assistant Tutor of St. Peter's College, Cambridge.

336 pp. (1860). Crown 8vo. cloth.

108. 60.

CONTENTS : Chap. I. Of Moments of Inertia.—II. D'Alembert's Principle.--III. Motion about a Fixed Axis.-IV. Motion in Two Dimensions.-V. Motion of a Rigid Body in Three Dimensions.—VI. Motion of a Flexible String.–VII. Motion of a System of Rigid Bodies.—VIII. Of Impulsive Forces.—IX. Miscellaneous Examples.

The numerous Examples which will be found at the end of each chapter have been chiefly selected from the Examination Papers set in the University and Colleges of Cambridge during the last few years.

Macmillan and Co.

ace's th.

17. A Treatise on Optics.

.

IOS. 6d.

68. 61

e Fant Places

By S. PARKINSON, B.D.
Fellow and Assistant Tutor of St. John's College, Cambridge.

304 pp. (1859). Crown 8vo.
The present work may be regarded as a new edition of the Treatise on
Optics, by the Rev. W. N. Griffin, which being some time ago out of
print, was very kindly and liberally placed at the disposal of the author.
The author has freely used the liberty accorded to him, and has re-arranged
the matter with considerable alterations and additions—especially in those
parts which required more copious explanation and illustration to render
the work suitable for the present course of ing in the University.
A colleetion of Examples and Problems has been appended, which are
sufficiently numerous and varied in character to afford an useful exercise
for the student: for the greater part of them recourse has been had to
the Examination Papers set in the University and the several Colleges
during the last twenty years.

Subjoined to the copious Table of Contents the author has ventured to indicate an elementary course of reading not unsuitable for the requirements of the First Three Days in the Cambridge Senate House Examinations.

Earth anches and its

and the

gid

Conic

18. Geometrical Treatise on

Sections.

WITH A COPIOUS COLLECTION OF EXAMPLES.

men. otion

III.

By W. H. DREW, M.A.

Second Master of Blackheath School.
Second Edition. Crown 8vo. cloth. 48. 6d. Nearly Ready.

In this work the subject of Conic Sections has been placed before
the student in such a form that, it is hoped, after mastering the ele-
ments of Euclid, he may find it an easy and interesting continuation of
his geometrical studies. With a view also of rendering the work a com-
plete Manual of what is required at the Universities, there have been
either embodied into the text, or inserted among the examples, every
book-work question, problem, and rider, which has been proposed in the
Cambridge examinations up to the present time.
Cambridge and London.

each et in ears. Co.

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CAMBRIDGE CLASS BOOKS

19. Plane Co-Ordinate Geometry
AS APPLIED TO THE STRAIGHT LINE AND THE

CONIC SECTIONS;
With Numerous Examples.

By I. TODHUNTER, M.A.
Third and Cheaper Edition. Crown 8vo. cloth. 78. 6d.

Nearly Ready. This Treatise exhibits the subject in a simple manner for the benefit of beginners, and at the same time includes in one volume all that students usually require. The Examples at the end of each chapter will, it is hoped, furnish sufficient exercise, as they have been carefully selected with the view of illustrating the most important points, and have been tested by repeated experience with pupils. 20. An Elementary Treatise on the

Theory of Equations,
WITH A COLLECTION OF EXAMPLES.

By I. TODHUNTER, M.A.,
Crown 8vo. cloth.

78.

6d. This treatise contains all the propositions which are usually included in elementary treatises on the Theory of Equations, together with a collec* tion of Examples for exercise. It may be read by those who are familiar with Algebra, since no higher knowledge is assumed, except in Arts. 175, 267, 308--314, which may be postponed by those who are not acquainted with De Moivre's Theorem in Trigonometry. This work may in fact be regarded as a sequel to that on Algebra by the same writer, and accordingly the student has occasionally been referred to the treatise on Algebra for preliminary information on some topics here discussed.

The Examples have been selected from the College and University examination papers, and the results have been given where it appeared necessary; in most cases however, from the nature of the question, the student will be able immediately to test the correctness of his answer. 21. Examples of Analytical Geometry

of Three Dimensions. Collected by I. TODHUNTER, M.A. 76 pp. (1858). Crown 8vo. cloth.

48. A collection of examples in illustration of Analytical Geometry of Three Dimensions has long been required both by students and teachers and the present work is published with the view of supplying the want.

Macmillan and Co.

mences.

22. Conic Sections and Algebraic

Geometry.
WITH NUMEROUS EASY EXAMPLES PROGRESSIVELY

ARRANGED.
By G. H. PUCKLE, M.A.

Principal of Windermere College.
Second Edition. 264 pp. (1856). Crown 8vo.

This book has been written with special reference to those difficulties and misapprehensions which commonly beset the student when he com

With this object in view, the earlier part of the subject has been dwelt on at length, and geometrical and numerical illustrations of the analysis have been introduced. The Examples appended to each section are mostly of a very elementary description. The work will, it is hoped, be found to contain all that is required by the upper classes of schools and by the generality of students at the Universities. 23. An Elementary Treatise on Trilinear

Co-Ordinates. THE METHOD OF RECIPROCAL POLARS, AND THE

THEORY OF PROJECTILES.

By N. M. FERRERS, M.A. Fellow and Mathematical Lecturer of Gonville and Caius Coll. Cambridge.

154 pp. (1861). Crown 8vo. cloth. 68. 6d. The object of the Author in writing on this subject has mainly been to place it on a basis altogether independent of the ordinary Cartesian System, instead of regarding it as only a special form of abridged Notation. A short chapter on Determinants has been introduced.

24. The Differential Calculus.

With Numerons Examples.

By I. TODHUNTER, M.A. Third Edition, 398 pp. (1860) Crown 8vo. cloth, 108. 6d.

This work is intended to exhibit a comprehensive view of the Differential Calculus on the method of Limits. In the more elementary portions, explanations have been given in considerable detail, with the hope that a reader who is without the assistance of a tutor may be enabled to acquire a competent acquaintance with the subject. More than one investigation of a theorem has been frequently given, because it is believed that the student derives advantage from viewing the same proposition under different aspects, and that in order to succeed in the examinations which he may have to undergo, he should be prepared for a considerable variety in the order of arranging the several branches of the subject, and for a corresponding variety in the mode of demonstration. Cambridge and London.

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CAMBRIDGE CLASS BOOKS

25. The Integral Calculus and Its

Applications.
With Numerous Examples.
By I. TODHUNTER, M.A.

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In writing the present Treatise on the Integral Calculus, the object has been to produce a work at once elementary and complete--adapted for the use of beginners, and sufficient for the wants of advanced students. In the selection of the propositions, and in the mode of establishing them, the author has endeavoured to exhibit fully and clearly the principles of the subject, and to illustrate all their most important results. In order that the student may find in the volume all that he requires, a large collection of Examples for exercise has been appended to the different chapters.

26. Differential Equations.

By GEORGE BOOLE, D.C.L.
Professor of Mathematics in the Queen's University, Ireland.
468 pp. (1859). Crown 8vo. cloth.

148. The Author has endeavoured in this treatise to convey as complete an account of the present state of knowledge on the subject of the Differential Equations as was consistent with the idea of a work intended, primarily, for elementary instruction. The object has been first of all to meet the wants of those who had no previous acquaintance with the subject, and also not quite to disappoint others who might seek for more advanced information. The earlier sections of each chapter contain that kind of matter which has usually been thought suitable for the beginner, while the latter ones are devoted either to an account of recent discovery, or to the discussion of such deeper questions of principle as are likely to present themselves to the reflective student in connection with the methods and processes of his previous course.

27. The Calculus of Finite Differences.

By GEORGE BOOLE, D.C.L. 248 pp. (1860). Crown 8vo. cloth. 108. 6d. In this work particular attention has been paid to the connexion of the methods with those of the Differential Calculus-a connexion which in some instances involves far more than a merely formal analogy. The work is in some measure designed as a sequel to the Author's Treatise on Differential Equations, and it has been composed on the same plan.

Macmillan and Co.

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