Doctor Zhivago

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Nov 23, 2010 - Fiction - 544 pages
52 Reviews
First published in Italy in 1957 amid international controversy, Doctor Zhivago is the story of the life and loves of a poet/physician during the turmoil of the Russian Revolution. Taking his family from Moscow to what he hopes will be shelter in the Ural Mountains, Zhivago finds himself instead embroiled in the battle between the Whites and the Reds. Set against this backdrop of cruelty and strife is Zhivago's love for the tender and beautiful Lara, the very embodiment of the pain and chaos of those cataclysmic times. Pevear and Volokhonsky masterfully restore the spirit of Pasternak's original—his style, rhythms, voicings, and tone—in this beautiful translation of a classic of world literature.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - featherbear - LibraryThing

Thought the movie was a snore, but since many LThing members seem to like it, I'll take another look, time permitting. As to the novel, need to mull it over a bit longer, though glad I read it ... Read full review

Review: Doctor Zhivago

User Review  - Max - Goodreads

Grand and sweeping in the Russian tradition, Doctor Zhivago deserves all the praise it has earned. A story of troubled times, of people surviving amidst chaos, of love and family and everyday routines ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

BORIS Leonidovich PASTERNAK won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1958 "for his important achievement both in contemporary lyrical poetry and in the field of the great Russian epic tradition.” — the Nobel Prize committee. Pasternak had to decline the honor because of the protests in his home country. Doctor Zhivago became an international bestseller and was translated into 18 languages but circulated only in secrecy and translation in Russia. In 1987 the Union of Soviet Writers posthumously reinstated Pasternak, a move that gave his works a legitimacy they had lacked in the Soviet Union since his expulsion from the writers' union in 1958 and that finally made possible the publication of Doctor Zhivago in the Soviet Union. Pasternak's son accepted his father's Nobel Prize medal at a ceremony in Stockholm in 1989.

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