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remember he told a lady,' but with an exception to the promise he then made? (which was to get her a pension); yet he broke even that,3 and, I confess, deceived us both. But here I desire to distinguish between a promise and a bargain, for he will be sure to keep the latter, when he has the fairest offer. . . . I cannot digest the preceding facts in so good a manner as I intended, because it is thought expedient, for some reasons, that the world should be informed of his excellency's merits as soon as possible. . . . As they are, they may serve for hints to any person who may hereafter have a mind' to write memoirs of his excellency's life.

Swift. 16671745.

XIII.—THE VISION OF MIRZA. On the fifth day of the moon, which 10 according to the - custom of my forefathers I always keep holy," after

having washed myself and offered up my morning devo- tions,12 I ascended the high hills of Bagdat, in order to

As I remember he told a lady, Et je me souviens que lui-même en faisait l'aveu à._? He then made, Qu'il lui faisait en ce moment. <3 Yet he broke even that, Cependant il manqua à cette même promesse.—4 For he will be sure to keep the latter, when he has, Car certainement il tiendra le marché avec celui qui lui aura fait.—5 I cannot digest the preceding facts in so good a manner as I intended, Je n'ai pu ranger les faits qui précèdent, convenablement comme je l'aurais voulu.__. It is thought expedient, Je l'ai cru utile.

Some, Diverses.—8 As they are they may serve for hints, Tels qu'ils - sont ils pourront servir de matériaux.-9 Who may hereafter have a mind, Qui, après quelque temps, aura l'envie.

" See § 49.–11 I always keep holy, Je sanctifie toujours. — ? Morning devotions, Prières du matin,

pass the rest of the day in meditation and prayer. As I was here airing myself on the tops of the mountains, I fell into a profound contemplation on the vanity of human life ; and passing from one thought to another : “Surely,” said I, “man is but a shadow and life a dream.” Whilst I was thus musing, I cast my eyes towards? the summit of a rock that was not far from me, where I discovered one in the habit of a shepherd, with a little musical instrument in his hand. As I looked upon him he applied it to his lips, and began to play upon it." The sound of it was exceedingly sweet, and wrought into a variety of tunes that were inexpressibly melodious,'. and altogether different from anything I had ever heard. They put me in mind of those heavenly airs that are played to the departed souls of good men upon their first arrival in Paradise, 1° to wear out the impressions of the last agonies, and qualify them for 11 the pleasures of that happy place. My heart melted away in secret raptures. 12

He (the genius) then led me to the highest pinnacle of the rock, and placing me on the top of it, “ Cast thy eyes castward,” said he, " and tell me what thou seest."

1 As I was here airing myself, Pendant que j'y prenais l'air.2 Towards, Sur.—3 Where I discovered one in the habit of a shepherd, Et j'y aperçus une figure en habit de berger.—4 He applied it to his lips, Il porta l'instrument à ses lèvres.—5 And began to play upon it, Et se mit à en jouer.–6 Wrought, Modulé.-_7 That were iner. pressibly melodious, D'une mélodie inexprimable.—8 From anything, De ce que._. They put me in mind of, Ils me firent penser à. See § 30, 5.-10 That are played to the departed souls of good men upon their first arrival in Paradise, Qui accueillent les âmes envolées des justes à leur entrée dans le paradis.—11 And qualify them for, Et les préparer aux.–12 Secret raptures, Secret ravissement.

“ I see,” said I, “ a huge valley, and a prodigious tide of water rolling through it.” 1

“ The valley that thou seest,” said he, “is the Vale of Misery, and the tide of water that thou seest is part of the great tide of eternity.”

• What is the reason,” said I, “ that the tide I see rises out of a thick mist at one end, and again loses itself in a thick mist at the other.?”.

“ What? thou seest,” said he, “is that portion of eternity which is called time, measured out by the sun, and reaching from 3 the beginning of the world to its consummation. Examine now,” said he, “ this sea that is bounded with darkness at both ends, and tell me what thou discoverest in it.”

"I see a bridge,” said I, “standings in the midst of the tide.”

“The bridge thou seest,” said he, “is human life ; - “consider it attentively.” : Upon a more leisurely survey of it, I found that it

consisted of threescore and ten entire arches, with several broken arches, which, added to those that were entire, made up the number about a hundred. As I was counting the arches, the genius told me that this bridge consisted at first of a thousand arches, but that a great flood swept away the rest, and left the bridge in the ruinous condition I now beheld it.

1 A prodigious tide of water rolling through it, Un prodigieux courant de mer qui roule à travers elle.—2 See § 20.–3 Measured out by the sun, and reaching from, Réglé par le soleil, depuis.—4 Examine now this sea that is bounded with darkness at both ends, Considère maintenant cette mer, qui à ses deux extrémités est bornée par des ténèbres.—5 Standing, Qui s'élève.—6 Upon a more leisurely survey of it, I found, L'ayant regardé plus à loisir, je vis._7 Added to those that were entire, Avec les autres.—8 Made up the number, Faisaient. Consisted, Était.

“But tell me further,”? said he, “ what thou discoverest on it.”

“I see multitudes of people p:issing over it,”3 said I,! “ and a black cloud hanging on each end of it.”+

As I looked more attentively, I saw several of the pas sengers dropping through the bridges into the great tide that flowed underneath it ;6 and upon further examination, perceived there were innumerable trap-doors that lay concealed in the bridge, which the passengers nu sooner trod upon, but they fell through them into the tide, and immediately disappeared. These hidden pitfalls were set very thick 10 at the entrance of the bridge, so that throngs of people no sooner broke through the cloud, but many of them fell into them." They grew thinner 12 towards the middle, but multiplied and lay closer together towards the end of the arches that were entire."

1 And left the bridge in the ruinous condition I now beheld it, Et l'avait laissé ruiné comme je le voyais maintenant._? Further, Encore 3 Passing over it, Qui le traversent.—4 Hanging on each end of it, Suspendu sur chacune de ses deux issues.—5 Several of the passengers dropping through the bridge, Plusieurs des voyageurs tomber au travers.—6 Into the great tide that flowed underneath it, Dans la grande marée qui conduit au-dessous.7 Perceived, Je découvris.—8 That lay concealed, Cachées.-9 Which the passengers no sooner trod upon, but they fell through them into the tide, and imine diately disappeared, Où l'on ne mettait le pied que pour s'enfoncer et disparaître à l'instant.—10 Were set very thick, Étaient trèsserrés._11 So that throngs of people no sooner broke through the cloud. but many of them fell into them, En sorte que des multitudes d'arri. vants, à peine sortis du nuage, s'y engloutissaient dès l'abord.12 Thinner, Moins nombreux.–13 Towards the end of the arches that were entire, En approchant des dernières arches complètes.

There were indeed some persons, but their number was very small, that continued a kind of hobbling march on the broken arches, but fell through one after another, being quite tired” and spent with so long a walk.

My heart was filled with a deep melancholy to see several dropping unexpectedly in the midst of mirth and jollity, and catching at everything that stood by them * to save themselves. Some were looking ups towards heaven in a thoughtful posture, and in the midst of a speculation' stumbled and fell out of sight. Multitudes were very busy in the pursuit of bubbles that glittered in their eyes and danced before them ; 10 but often when they thought themselves within the reach of them,11 their footing failed, and down they sunk.12

I here fetched 13 a deep sigh. “ Alas !” said I, “ man was made 14 in vain! How is he given away 15 to misery , and mortality! tortured in life, and swallowed up in death!”

The genius, being moved with compassion towards melo bid me to cast mine eyes on 17 that thick mist into

That continued a kind of hobbling march on, S'avançaient en clopinant jusque sur.—2 Being quite tired, Épuisés comme ils étaient. _3 Jollity, Éclats de rire.—4 And catching at everything that stood by them, Et s'accrochaient à tout ce qui était près d'eux.

Some were looking up, D'autres avaient les yeux.–6 Posture, Attitude.—7 Speculation, Contemplation.—& And fell out of sight, Et on ne les revoyait plus.—9 Multitudes were very busy in the pursuit of bubbles, Il y avait des multitudes affairées à la poursuite de babioles.—10 Translate : That glittered and danced before their eyes._11 When they thought themselves within the reach of them, Au moment où ils croyaient les saisir.–12 And down they sunk, Et ils étaient précipités.—13 I here fetched, Je poussai.—14 Was made, A été créé.—15 How he is given away, Il est abandonné.—16 Moved ... towards me, Touché.-17 To cast mine eyes on, De regarder vers.

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