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ment of Justice with the names of those within their respective jurisdictions who have such certificates of citizenship and who have taken permanent residence in the country of their nativity, or in any other foreign country, and such statements, duly certified, shall be admissible in evidence in all courts in proceedings to cancel certificates of citizenship.

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SEC. 23. That any person who knowingly procures naturalization in violation of the provisions of this Act shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars, or shall be imprisoned not more than five years, or both, and upon conviction the court in which such conviction is had shall thereupon adjudge and declare the final order admitting such person to citizenship void. Jurisdiction is hereby conferred on the courts having jurisdiction of the trial of such offense to make such adjudication. Any person who knowingly aids, advises, or encourages any person not entitled thereto to apply for or to secure naturalization, or to file the preliminary papers declaring an intent to become a citizen of the United States, or who in any naturalization proceeding knowingly procures or gives false testimony as to any material fact, or who knowingly makes an affidavit false as to any material fact required to be proved in such proceeding, shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars, or imprisoned not more than five years, or both.

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Approved, June 29, 1906.

No. 194. Prohibition of Campaign Con

tributions by Corporations

January 26, 1907

A BILL to prohibit money contributions by corporations in connection with political elections, said to be identical with a bill introduced in 1901 by William E. Chandler of New Hampshire but not acted upon, was introduced in the Senate, February 19, 1906, by Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina, and on June 9 passed without a division. In the House the bill was referred to the Committee on Election of President and Vice-President

and Representatives in Congress, but no further action was taken during the session. January 15, 1907, in the second session, the bill was reported with amendments, and on the 21st passed without a division under suspension of the rules. The Senate concurred in the House amendments, and on the 26th the act was approved. An act of June 25, 1910 (amended August 19, 1911, and August 23, 1912), provided for publicity of political contributions in Congressional elections.

REFERENCES. Text in U. S. Stat. at Large, XXXIV., Part I, 864, 865. The debate was unimportant. See Senate Report 3056, 59th Cong., ist Sess., and House Report 6397, 59th Cong., ad Sess.

An Act To prohibit corporations from making money contributions in con

nection with political elections.

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Be it enacted That it shall be unlawful for any national bank, or any corporation organized by authority of any laws of Congress, to make a money contribution in connection with any election to any political office. It shall also be unlawful for any corporation whatever to make a money contribution in connection with any election at which Presidential and VicePresidential electors or a Representative in Congress is to be voted for or any election by any State legislature of a United States Senator. Every corporation which shall make any contribution in violation of the foregoing provisions shall be subject to a fine not exceeding five thousand dollars, and every officer or director of any corporation who shall consent to any contribution by the corporation in violation of the foregoing provisions shall upon conviction be punished by a fine of not exceeding one thousand and not less than two hundred and fifty dollars, or by imprisonment for a term of not more than one year, or both such fine and imprisonment in the discretion of the court.

Approved, January 26, 1907.

No. 195. Immigration Act

February 20, 1907

A COMPREHENSIVE act to regulate immigration was passed March 3, 1903, and an amendatory act March 22, 1904. A bill further to regulate

the immigration of aliens, introduced in the Senate, February 14, 1906, by William P. Dillingham of Vermont, was reported with amendments March 29, and May 23 passed without a division. On the 29th the bill was reported with amendments in the House, and June 5 was recommitted. It was reported back on the 11th, and on the 25th passed without a division. The Senate disagreed to the House amendments, and the bill went to a conference committee. No further action was taken during the session. At the next session, February 13, 1907, the report of the conference committee was submitted, and was accepted by the Senate on the 16th and by the House on the 19th. The next day the act was approved. Only the most important substantive provisions of the act are given here.

REFERENCES. - Text in U. S. Stat. at Large, XXXIV., Part I, 898-911. For the debates see the Cong. Record, 59th Cong., ist and 2d Sess. See also Senate Report 2186 and House Reports 4558 and 4912, 59th Cong., ad Sess.

An Act To regulate the immigration of aliens into the United States.

Be it enacted ... , That there shall be levied, collected, and paid a tax of four dollars for every alien entering the United States. The said tax shall be paid to the collector of customs of the port or customs district to which said alien shall come, or, if there be no collector at such port or district, then to the collector nearest thereto, by the master, agent, owner, or consignee of the vessel, transportation line, or other conveyance or vehicle bringing such alien to the United States. The money thus collected, together with all fines and rentals collected under the laws regulating the immigration of aliens into the United States, shall be paid into the Treasury of the United States, and shall constitute a permanent appropriation to be called the "immigrant fund," to be used under the direction of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor to defray the expense of regulating the immigration of aliens into the United States under said laws, including the contract labor laws, the cost of reports of decisions of the Federal courts, and digest thereof, for the use of the Commissioner-General of Immigration, and the salaries and expenses of all officers, clerks, and employees appointed to enforce said laws. The tax imposed by this section shall be a lien upon the vessel, or other vehicle of carriage or transportation bringing such aliens to the United States, and shall be a debt in favor of the United States against the owner or owners of such vessel, or other vehicle, and the payment of

such tax may be enforced by any legal or equitable remedy. That the said tax shall not be levied upon aliens who shall enter the United States after an uninterrupted residence of at least one year, immediately preceding such entrance, in the Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland, the Republic of Cuba, or the Republic of Mexico, nor upon otherwise admissible residents of any possession of the United States, nor upon aliens in transit through the United States, nor upon aliens who have been lawfully admitted to the United States and who later shall go in transit from one part of the United States to another through foreign contiguous territory: . ... Provided further, That the provisions of this section shall not apply to aliens arriving in Guam, Porto Rico, or Hawaii; but if any such alien, not having become a citizen of the United States, shall later arrive at any port or place of the United States on the North American Continent the provisions of this section shall apply : Provided further, That whenever the President shall be satisfied that passports issued by any foreign government to its citizens to go to any country other than the United States or to any insular possession of the United States or to the Canal Zone are being used for the purpose of enabling the holders to come to the continental territory of the United States to the detriment of labor conditions therein, the President may refuse to permit such citizens of the country issuing such passports to enter the continental territory of the United States from such other country or from such insular possessions or from the Canal Zone.

That the following classes of aliens shall be excluded from admission into the United States: All idiots, imbeciles, feeble-minded persons, epileptics, insane persons, and persons who have been insane within five years previous; persons who have had two or more attacks of insanity at any time previously; paupers; persons likely to become a public charge; professional beggars; persons afflicted with tuberculosis or with a loathsome or dangerous contagious disease; persons not comprehended within any of the foregoing excluded classes who are found to be and are certified by the examining surgeon as being mentally or physically defective, such mental or physical defect being of a nature which may affect the ability of such

SEC. 2.

alien to earn a living; persons who have been convicted of or admit having committed a felony or other crime or misdemeanor involving moral turpitude; polygamists, or persons who admit their belief in the practice of polygamy, anarchists, or persons who believe in or advocate the overthrow by force or violence of the Government of the United States, or of all government, or of all forms of law, or the assassination of public officials; (persons coming for immoral purposes;] persons hereinafter called contract laborers, who have been induced or solicited to migrate to this country by offers or promises of employment or in consequence of agreements, oral, written or printed, express or implied, to perform labor in this country of any kind, skilled or unskilled; those who have been, within one year from the date of application for admission to the United States, deported as having been induced or solicited to migrate as above described; any person whose ticket or passage is paid for with the money of another, or who is assisted by others to come, unless it is affirmatively and satisfactorily shown that such person does not belong to one of the foregoing excluded classes, and that said ticket or passage was not paid for by any corporation, association, society, municipality, or foreign government, either directly or indirectly; all children under sixteen years of age, unaccompanied by one or both of their parents, at the discretion of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor or under such regulations as he may from time to time prescribe: Provided, That nothing in this Act shall exclude, if otherwise admissible, persons convicted of an offense purely political, not involving moral turpitude: Provided further, That the provisions of this section relating to the payments for tickets or passage by any corporation, association, society, municipality, or foreign government shall not apply to the tickets or passage of aliens in immediate and continuous transit through the United States to foreign contiguous territory: And provided further, That skilled labor may be imported if labor of like kind unemployed can not be found in this country: And provided further, That the provisions of this law applicable to contract labor shall not be held to exclude professional actors, artists, lecturers, singers, ministers of any religious denomination, professors for colleges or seminaries, persons belonging to any recognized

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