The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688, Volume 10

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J.J. Tourneisen, 1789 - Great Britain
 

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Page 90 - Let the high praises of God be in their mouth, and a twoedged sword in their hand; 7 to execute vengeance upon the heathen, and punishments upon the people; ' to bind their kings with chains, and their nobles with fetters of iron; 'to execute upon them the judgment written: this honour have all his saints.
Page 133 - There is, sir, but one stage more, which though turbulent and troublesome, is yet a very short one. Consider, it will soon carry you a great way; it will carry you from earth to heaven; and there you shall find, to your great joy, the prize to which you hasten, a crown of glory.
Page 131 - At these words the child looked very steadfastly upon him. " Mark, child ! what I say : they will cut off my head ! and perhaps make thee a king ; but mark what I say, thou must not be a king as long as thy brothers Charles and James are alive. They will cut off thy brothers' heads, when they can catch them ! And thy head too they will cut off at last ! Therefore, I charge thee, do not be made a king by them...
Page 136 - THE character of this Prince, as that of most men, if not of all men, was mixed; but his virtues predominated extremely above his vices, or, more properly speaking, his imperfections: For scarce any of his faults rose to that pitch as to merit the appellation of vices. To consider him in the most...
Page 137 - Had he been born an absolute prince, his humanity and good sense had rendered his reign happy, and his memory precious : had the limitations on prerogative been in his time quite fixed and certain, his integrity had made him regard as sacred the boundaries of the constitution.
Page 229 - It is you," said he, addressing himself to the house, "that have forced me upon this. I have sought the Lord night and day, that he would rather slay me than put me upon this work.
Page 229 - You are no longer a parliament. I tell you, you are no longer a parliament. The Lord has done with you: he has chosen other instruments for carrying on his work." Sir Harry Vane exclaiming against this proceeding, he cried with a loud voice, "O! Sir Harry Vane, Sir Harry Vane! The Lord deliver me from Sir Harry Vane!
Page 229 - It is you, continued he, to the " members, that have forced me upon this. I have " fought the Lord night and day, that he would rather " flay me than put me upon this work.
Page 124 - Charles Stuart, being admitted king of England, and intrusted with a limited power ; yet nevertheless, from a wicked design to erect an unlimited and tyrannical government, had traitorously and maliciously levied war against the present parliament, and the people whom they represented, and was therefore impeached as a tyrant, traitor, murderer, and a public and implacable enemy to the commonwealth.
Page 133 - At one blow was his head severed from his body. A man in a vizor performed the office of executioner: Another, in a like disguise, held up to the spectators the head streaming with blood, and cried aloud. This is the head of a traitor! It...

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