Heavy Drinking: The Myth of Alcoholism as a Disease

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University of California Press, Feb 9, 1988 - Medical - 195 pages
Heavy Drinking informs the general public for the first time how recent research has discredited almost every widely held belief about alcoholism, including the very concept of alcoholism as a single disease with a unique cause. Herbert Fingarette presents constructive approaches to heavy drinking, including new methods of helping heavy drinkers and social policies for preventing heavy drinking and the harms associated with it.
 

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User Review  - crazybatcow - LibraryThing

It seems well researched, but it's dated, obviously, since it was written in 1989. And it takes the opposite point of view on alcoholism than what is currently "politically correct". (So, basically ... Read full review

Heavy drinking: the myth of alcoholism as a disease

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Fingarette aims to refute evidence that alcoholism is a disease. Rejecting the terms alcoholic and disease, he points out that many "heavy drinkers'' do not experience craving and/or loss of control ... Read full review

Contents

What Science Now Knows but the Public Doesnt
1
The Classic Disease Concept of Alcoholism
11
Where Did We Get the Idea That Alcoholism Is a Disease?
13
Can Alcoholics Control Their Drinking?
31
What Causes Alcoholism?
48
Have Alcoholism Treatments Really Worked?
70
New Approaches to Heavy Drinking
97
Understanding Heavy Drinking as a Way of Life
99
Helping the Heavy Drinker
114
Social Policies to Prevent and Control Heavy Drinking
133
AFTERWORD
144
WORKS CITED
147
INDEX
163
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Page ix - The final preparation of the manuscript was done while I was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California (1990-1991).

About the author (1988)

Herbert Fingarette, a distinguished professor at the University of California, has been a consultant on alcoholism and addiction to the World Health Organization, and a Fellow of the Stanford Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. His work has had a significant influence on the U.S. Supreme Court, state supreme courts, and current national policy makers on substance abuse.

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