E. M. Forster

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New Directions Publishing, 1965 - Literary Criticism - 194 pages
The modern novel in its most cogent and permanent form" - this has been the achievement of E. M. Forster; his masterpiece, A Passage to India, belongs with perhaps three or four other works in English at the pinnacle of literary craftsmanship in this century. Yet for many years Forster's genius was virtually unrecognized in America. Not until 1943, when Lionel Trilling's authoritative and discerning study was first published, did Forster find his way to a broad American audience. In this 1964 revision of the first paperbook edition, Mr. Trilling added a preface and brought the bibliography up to date. His book performstwo services: it is a critical-biographical introduction to the master novelist and his works; it is in itself a primary document in the development of, contemporary American criticism. Here is criticism functioning at its best, deftly, surely, wittily, within a framework of the ideas which are basic to literary thought today. "
 

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Contents

PREFACE
1
FORSTER AND THE LIBERAL
7
SAWSTON AND CAMBRIDGE
25
A STATEMENT OF THEMES
38
WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD
57
THE LONGEST JOURNEY
76
A ROOM WITH A VIEW
97
HOWARDS END
113
A PASSAGE TO INDIA
136
FORSTERS LITERARY CRITI
162
Copyright

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About the author (1965)

Trilling has exerted a wide influence upon literature and criticism: as university professor at Columbia, where he taught English literature, and in his long association with Partisan Review, Kenyon Review, and the Kenyon School of English (now the School of Letters, Indiana University). He considered himself a true "liberal"---having a "vision of a general enlargement of [individual] freedom and rational direction in human life. Yet even liberalism, Trilling insisted, was simply one of several ways of organizing the complexity of life; however, it can reveal "variousness and possibility" just as literature, its subject, does. Trilling was viewed as a genteel moralist, but never would settle for mere simplification in literary analysis even if it led to understanding.

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