The Imperial Horizons of British Protestant Missions, 1880-1914

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Andrew N. Porter
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2003 - Religion - 250 pages
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Christian missions have long been associated with the growth of empire and colonial rule. For just as long, the nature and consequences of that association have provoked animated debate over such themes as "culture" and "identity." This volume brings together studies of changing attitudes and practices in Protestant missions during the hectic decades of European imperial and territorial expansion between 1880 and 1914.

Written by acknowledged experts, "The Imperial Horizons of British Protestant Missions includes chapters on the imperial and ecclesiastical ambitions of the high-church Society for the Propagation of the Gospel; the role of empire as an arena for working out Christian understandings of atonement; the international politics of the missionary movement; conflicting understandings of race, missionary strategies, and the transfer of Western scientific knowledge; Indian nationalist responses to Christian teaching; and changing interpretations of Western missionary methods in China and of female missionary roles in South Africa.

Contributors: D. W. Bebbington
John W. de Gruchy
Deborah Gaitskell
John M. MacKenzie
Chandra Mallampalli
Steven Maughan
Lauren F. Pfister
Andrew Porter
Andrew C. Ross
Brian Stanley

 

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Christian missions have long been associated with the growth of empire and colonial rule. For just as long, the nature and consequences of that association have provoked animated debate over such themes as "culture" and "identity." This volume brings together studies of changing attitudes and practices in Protestant missions during the hectic decades of European imperial and territorial expansion between 1880 and 1914.Written by acknowledged experts, "The Imperial Horizons of British Protestant Missions includes chapters on the imperial and ecclesiastical ambitions of the high-church Society for the Propagation of the Gospel; the role of empire as an arena for working out Christian understandings of atonement; the international politics of the missionary movement; conflicting understandings of race, missionary strategies, and the transfer of Western scientific knowledge; Indian nationalist responses to Christian teaching; and changing interpretations of Western missionary methods in China and of female missionary roles in South Africa.Contributors: D. W. BebbingtonJohn W. de GruchyDeborah GaitskellJohn M. MacKenzieChandra MallampalliSteven MaughanLauren F. PfisterAndrew PorterAndrew C. RossBrian Stanley  

Contents

Introduction
1
Atonement Sin and Empire 188o1914
14
Imperial Christianity? Bishop Montgomery and the Foreign Missions of the Church of England 18951910
32
The Making of the Missions and Governments Report at the World Missionary Conference Edinburgh 1910
58
The African Experience
85
Missionaries Science and the Environment in NineteenthCentury Africa
106
The Field Experience of Women Missionaries in South Africa
131
Imitation and Autonomy in Calcutta and Madras
158
James Hudson Taylor and Timothy Richard
183
Who Did They Think They Were? Some Reflections from a Theologian on Grand Narratives and Identity in the History of Missions
213
Bibliography
226
Index
242
Copyright

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