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STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA.

ALLEGHANY VALLEY.
ALLENTOWN.
ATLANTIC AND GREAT WESTERN.
BarcLAY.
BEAVER MEADOW.
BELLEFONTE AND Snow Shoe.
CATASAUQUA.
CatawiSSA, WILLIAMSPORT AND Erie.
CHARTIERS VALLEY.
CHESTER VALLEY.
CHESTNUT Hui.
CLEVEL'D, PAINESVILLE & ASHTABULA.
CLEVELAND & PITTSBURG.
CUMBERLAND VALLEY.
DAUPHIN & SUSQUEHANNA.
DELAWARE, LACKAWANNA & WESTERN.
DELAWARE AND HUDSON CANAL Com-

PANY'S RAILROAD.
EAST MAHONOY.
East PENNSYLVANIA.
ERIE AND NORTH East.
ERIE AND PITTSBURG,
FAYETTE COUNTY.
FRANKLIN.
GETTYSBURG.
HANOVER.
HARRISBURG, PORTSMOUTH, Mr. Joy &

LANCASTER.
HEMPFIELD.
HUNTINGDON AND BROAD Top Mt.
LACKAWANNA.
LACKAWANNA AND BLOOMSBURG.
LACKAWANNA AND LANESBORO'.
LEBANON VALLEY.
LEHigh LUZERNE.
LEHIGH AND SUSQUEHANNA.
LEHIGH VALLEY.
LITTLE SCHUYLKILL.
LITTLESTOWN.
LORBERRY CREEK.
LYKENS' VALLEY.
M'CAULEY MOUNTAIN.
M’KEAN COUNTY.

Mauch CHUNK AND SUMMIT IIUL. MEADVILLE. MILJ. CREEK AND MINE Hul. MINE HUL AND SCHUYLKILL HAVEN. Mount CARBON. MOUNT CARBON AND Port CARBON. New CASTLE AND DARLINGTON. NEW YORK AND ERIE. NorthERN CENTRAL. North LEBANON. NORTH WESTERN. North PENNSYLVANIA. OHIO AND PENNSYLVANIA. PENNSYLVANIA. PENNSYLVANIA COAL. Phila. AND BALTIMORE CENTRAL. PHILADELPHIA City PASSENGER. PHILA., GERMANTOWN & Norristown. PHILADELPHIA AND READING. PHILADELPHIA AND SUNBURY. PHILADELPHIA AND TREnton. Phila., WILMINGTON & BALTIMORE. PITTSBURG AND CONNELLSVILLE. PITTSBURG, Ft. WAYNE AND Chicago. PITTSBURG AND STEUBENVILLE. QUAKAKE. SCHUYLKILL AND SUSQUEHANNA. SCHUYLKILL VALLEY. SHAMOKIN VALLEY AND POTTSVILLE. STRASBURG. SUNBURY AND ERIE. SWATARA. Tioga. TREVORTON. TYRONE AND CLEARFIELD. TYRONE AND Lock HAVEN. VENANGO. WESTCHESTER. WESTCHESTER AND PHILADELPHIA. WILLIAMSPORT AND ELMIRA. WRIGHTSVILLE, YORK & GETTYSBURG. YORK AND CUMBERLAND. YORK AND MARYLAND Line,

The railroads first opened in the State of Pennsylvania were constructed for the purpose of connecting the Eastern or Anthracite Coal Fields with several lines of canals designed to serve as their outlets. It was found impossible to extend the canals to the mines, and hence the necessity for

some means of land transportation more expeditious and economical than the ordinary earth roads. The railroad first constructed in the State, and the second in the United States, was the Mauch Chunk and Summit Hill, from a place of the same name on the Lehigh Canal to the coal mines of the Lehigh Company. It was brought into use in 1827. It was originally laid with a flat bar, 2x} inches. The loaded cars descended by their own gravity, and were drawn back by mules. The road belongs to the Lebigh Coal and Navigation Company, and no statement of its cost or earnings is made distinct from the other works of the company.

The second railroad constructed was the Carbondale and Honesdale, extending from the Delaware and Hudson Canal to the Northern or Lackawanna Coal Fields. It was opened in 1829. It was 164 miles long, and laid with an ordinary flat rail. It is a gravity road, made up of short and long planes--the cars being drawn up the former by stationary engines, and descending the latter by their own gravity. It has been entirely re-constructed, and extended 10 miles. The road belongs to the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company of New York. No separate statement of its earnings is given in the reports of that company.

The Mill Creek and Mine Hill Railroad, extending from Palo Alto on the Schuylkill Canal to the Coal Mines, 4 miles, was also opened in 1829. The road was worked by horse-power for many years. Several branches have been constructed, making an aggregate length of line at the present time of 12.52 miles. No statement of its affairs prior to 1848 could be obtained. Since that time it has been a productive work, paying dividends at the rate of 10 per cent. annually.

In 1830, 12.73 miles were opened: the Schuylkill Valley, from Port Carbon to Tuscarora, 9.23 miles; and the Union Canal Company's Road at Pine Grove, 3} miles. To the former severad branches have been added making the aggregate length of line 24.45 miles. No statement of its affairs prior to 1848 could be obtained. Since that time the road has paid dividends at the rate of 6 per cent. annually.

In 1831, 20.50 miles were opened: the Mine Hill and Schuylkill Haven, 134 miles, and the Mount Carbon, 7 miles. The main line of the former has been extended 11 miles, and it has 474 miles of branch roads. The road has been a successful work, having paid dividends averaging 11 per cent. annually. The Mount Carbon has also been a successful work, having paid dividends at the rate of 63 per cent. annually.

In 1833, 48.7 miles were opened : the Philadelphia and Trenton, 28.2 miles; the Room Run, 5 miles; and the Lykens Valley, 151 miles. In 1836, a contract was made with the Camden and Amboy Company, whereby the share capitals of the two companies were to share in the same rate of dividend. In 1837 the latter purchased the greater portion of the shares of the former, and the two roads may now be considered as one line. The Room Run Railroad belongs to the Lehigh Coal Navigation Company. With reference to the Lykens Valley Railroad, no historical information could be obtained.

In 1832, the Little Schuylkill was opened 20 miles, and the Philadelphia, Germantown and Norristown, to Germantown, 7 miles. The Little Schuylkill is a mining as well as a transportation company. No account of its financial affairs could be obtained previous to 1852. From that year to 1857 it paid dividends at the rate of 7 per cent.

No dividends wero paid for 1858 and 1859. The Philadelphia, Germantown and Norristown was completed to Norristown in 1835. It was for many years an unproductive work. In 1847 its affairs were re-organized, whereby it became relieved of a large portion of its indebtedness. It cominenced the payment of dividends in 1850, which, for four years (1856-9), has averaged 10 per cent.

In 1834, 127 miles were opened: the Philadelphia and Columbia, 82 miles; the Alleghany Portage, 36 miles, and the Westchester, 9 miles. The two former were portions of the State system of public works, and were sold in 1857 to the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. The Westchester, which has been run without profit, as a general rule, is now leased to the same company.

No new road was opened in 1835. In 1836, the Beaver Meadow Railroad, 204 miles long, was opened. This company publishes no statement of its affairs, and no information could be obtained in reference to the same, except that contained in the report made to the Auditor of the State. It has for many years past been a productive work, and last year paid dividends to its stockholders equaling 12 per cent.

In 1837, the Harrisburg, Portsmouth, Mount Joy and Lancaster Railroad, 36 miles long, was opened. This road was leased to the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in 1819, and now forms a part of its line. It has for several years past been a productive work, and has paid dividends averaging about 3 per cent on the share capital of the company, since it was opened. The Cumberland Valley Railroad was opened in 1837. It was perfectly constructed work, and its earnings for several years were only sufficient to pay expenses and interest on its debt, about $275,000. In 18-19 its re-construction was commenced, and completed in the following year. Since that time it has been a productive work, although it has not yet paid dividends on its common stock. The Strasburg Railroad, running from the Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad, 4.25 m:les long, was opened in 1837.

In 1838, 142 miles were opened: the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore, 98 miles, and the Franklin, 22 miles. The Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad has for several yetirs past been a productive work, and hus for the whole period since its opening paid dividends averaging about 3 per cent. annually. Franklin Railroad Company became embarrassed soon after the opening of its road, which was operated by a sequestrator till 1852, when it became unsafe for trains to run over it and

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they were consequently discontinued. In 1859 the road was 1 j-constructed, and is now operated by the Cumberland Valley Railroad Company. No report of its affairs since its re-construction has been made. The York and Maryland Line, constructed and owned by the Baltimore and Susquehanna Company, and formning part of the line of its road, was opened in 1838.

In 1839, 83 miles were openedl; the Philadelphia and Reading, 58 miles, and the Williamsport and Elmira, 25 miles. The Philadelphia and Reading Railroad, which was fully opened in 1842, has returned to its stockholders dividends at the rate of 4.65 per cent. annually. A portion of its dividends have been paid in certificates of stock. It is the great coal railroad of the country. The Williamsport and Elmira was operated for many years without profit, and in 1849 was sold, and a new company organized, by which the old road was re-constructed, and its line extended to Elmira, in the State of New York, to which it was opened in 1854. The company soon after became embarrassed in its affairs, which have been re-organized, by the conversion of a portion of its debts into a preferred stock. The road has paid nothing to its stockholders.

In 1840, 63.45 miles of railroad were opened : the Lehigh and Susquehanna, 19.71 miles; the Lorberry Creek, 5.13 miles; the Tioga, 25.61 miles, and the Wrightsville, York and Gettysburg, 13 miles. The Lehigh and Susquehanna Railroad belongs to the Lehigh Navigation and Coal Company. The Lorberry Creek is an unimportant work, used exclusively in the transportation of coal. The Tioga Railroad was re-constructed in 1852. To that date it had been an unproductive work. For three years (1857–9) it has paid dividends equaling 6 per cent. on its preferred stock. Its revenues are almost exclusively derived from the transportation of coal. The Wrightsville, York and Gettysburg is leased to and run by the Northern Central Railroad, and has earned dividends for the past five years equaling about 2 per cent. annually. Previous thereto it was an unproductive work.

No additional mileage was opened till 1812, when the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad was completed, from Reading to Mount Carbon, 35 miles.

No mileage was opened in 1843. In 1844, the Mount Carbon and Port Carbon, 2}, and the Swatara, 6 miles, were opened. The former has been a productive work, having paid dividends at the rate of 12 per cent. . annually. The Swatara is an unimportant work and is exclusively engaged in the transportation of coal. No account of its operations could be obtained.

In 1848 that portion of the New York and Erie Railroad in the State of Pennsylvania, 42 miles, was opened.

In 1849, 72 miles of the Pennsylvania Railroad was opened. This road was fully opened in 1854, by the completion of the Mountain Division, previous to which the Portage Railroad was used for crossing the mountains. This road has been a productive work, and has paid dividends averaging about 5 per cent. annually.

In 1850, 112 miles of railroad were opened : the Pennsylvania Coal Company's road, 47 miles, and the Pennsylvania Railroad (extended), 65 miles. The Pennsylvania Coal Company is engaged in mining, as well as in the transportation of coal. The enterprize has been productive, having returned to its stockholders dividends averaging 6 per cent.

In 1851, 220 miles of railroad were opened: the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western (northern division), 63 miles; the York and Cumberland, 27 miles; the eastern portion of the Ohio and Pennsylvania, 42 miles; the Dauphin and Susquehanna, 18 miles; the Columbia Branch of the Harrisburg and Lancaster Railroad, 18 miles, and the Pennsylvania (extended), 52 miles. The Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, for several years after its opening, paid dividends averaging about 5 per cent., when it became embarrassed, and made an assignment of its property for the benefit of its creditors. Its affuirs, however, were soon adjusted, and the company has again resumed the payment of dividends. The Ohio and Pennsylvania, now the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago, for a time was regarded as a successful work, but since its consolidation with the Ohio and Indiana, and Fort Wayne and Chicago, has been greatly embarrassed, having failed to meet the interest accruing on its funded debts. Measures are now in progress for the reorganization of its affairs. The Dauphin and Susquehanna is now known as the Schuylkill and Susquehanna Railroad. It has been an unproductive work, and in 1859 the road was sold, and a new company organized under the present title. The York and Cumberland Railroad was consolidated into the Northern Central in 1854.

In 1852, 82.90 miles were opened: the Erie and North East, 18.50 miles; the Hanover Branch, 12.90 miles; that portion of the Cleveland and Erie Railroad in the State of Pennsylvania, 25.50 miles, and the Pennsylvania Railroad (extended), 26 miles. The Erie and North East is now virtually consolidated into the Buffalo and State Line Company, of New York. It has been a productive work, having paid dividends at the rate of 10 per cent. The Hanover Branch has paid only one dividend of 2 per cent. The Cleveland and Erie Railroad is described under the Railroads of Ohio.

In 1853, 31.50 miles were opened: the Chester Valley, 21.50 miles; the Westchester and Philadelphia, 6.25 miles, and the Tioga (extended), 3.75 miles. Both the Chester Valley and the Westchester have been unproductive works, and have been greatly embarrassed in their affairs.

In 1854, 259.67 miles were opened: the Catawissa, Williamsport and Erie, 64 miles; the Chestnut Hill, 4.17 miles; the North Lebanon, 7.50 miles; the Sunbury and Erie, 27.50, and the Trevorton, 14.50. The following roads were extended : the Little Schuylkill, 8 mniles; the Pennsylvania, 39 miles; the Dauphin and Susquehanna, 36 miles; the Williamsport and Elmira, 53 miles, and the Westchester and Philadelphia, 6 miles. The Catawissa, Williamsport and Erie succeeded to the Little Schuylkill and

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