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GLOSTER'S DEFORMITY. Why, love forswore me in my mother's womb: And, for I should not deal in her soft laws She did corrupt frail nature with some bribe To shrink mine arm up like a wither'd shrub; . To make an envious mountain on my back, Where sits deformity to mock my body; To shape my legs of an unequal size; To disproportion me in every part, Like to a chaos, or an unlick'd bear whelp, That carries no impression like the dam. And am I then a man to be belov'd ?

GLOSTER'S DISSIMULATION, Why, I can smile, and murder while I smile; And cry, content, to that which grieves my heart; And wet my cheeks with artificial tears, And frame my face to all occasions. I'll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall; I'll slay more gazers than the basilisk; I'll play the orator as well as Nestor, Deceive more slily then Ulysses could And, like a Sinon, take another Troy; I can add colours to the chameleon; Change shapes, with Proteus, for advantages, And set the murd'rous Machiavel to school, Can I do this, and cannot get a crown?

ACT IV.

HENRY VI. ON HIS OWN LENITY.

I have not stoppd mine ears to their demands, Nor posted off their suits with slow delays; My pity hath

alm to heal their wounds, My mildness hath allay'd their swelling griefs, My mercy dry'd their water-flowing tears: I have not been desirous of their wealth, Nor much oppress’d them with great subsidies, Nor forward of revenge, though they much err'd.

ACT V.

DYING SPEECH OF THE EARL OF WARWICK.

Ah who is nigh? come to me, friend or foe, And tell me, who is victor, York, or Warwick? Why ask I that? my mangled body shows, My blood, my want of strength, my sick heart shows, That I must yield my body to the earth, And, by my fall, the conquest to my foe. Thus yields the cedar to the axe's edge, Whose arms gave shelter to the princely eagle, Under whose shade the ramping lion slept ! Whose top-branch over-peerd Jove's spreading tree, And kept low shrubs from winter's powerful wind. These eyes, that now are dimm'd with death's black

veil, Have been as piercing as the mid-day sun, To search the secret treasons of the world: The wrinkles in my brows, now fill'd with blood, Were liken'd oft to kingly sepulchres; For who liv'd king, but I could dig his grave? And who durst smile, when Warwick bent his brow? Lo, now my glory smeard in dust and blood! My parks, my walks, my manors that I had, Even now forsake me: and, of all my lands, Is nothing left me, but my body's length! QUEEN MARGARET'S SPEECH BEFORE THE BATTLE OP

TEWKSBURY.

Lords, knights, and gentlemen, what I should say
My tears gainsay;* for every word I speak,
Ye see, I drink the water of mine eyes.
Therefore, no more but this:-Henry, your sove-

reign,
Is prisoner to the foe; his state usurp'd,
His realm a slaughter-house, his subjects slain,
His statutes cancell'd, and his treasure spent;
And yonder is the wolf, that makes this spoil.
You fight in justice: then, in God's name, lords,
Be valiant, and give signal to the fight.

* Unsay, deny.

GOS Leto

KING HENRY VI.,

PART I.

ACT I.

GLORY.

GLORY is like a circle in the water,
Which never ceaseth to enlarge itself,
Till, by broad spreading, it disperse to nought,

ACT V.

MARRIAGE.

Marriage is a matter of more worth Than to be dealt in by attorneyship. *

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For what is wedlock forced, but a hell,
An age of discord and continual strife?
Whereas the contrary bringeth forth bliss,
And is a pattern of celestial peace.

KING HENRY VI.

PART II.

ACT T.

A RESOLVED AND AMEITIOUS WOMAN. FOLLOW I must, I cannot go before, While Gloster bears this base and humble mind, Were I a man, a duke, and next of blood, I would remove these tedious stumbling-blocks, And smooth my way upon their headless necks: And, being a woman, I will not be slack To play my part in fortune's pageant.

* By the discretional agency of another

ACT II.
GOD'S GOODNESS EVER TO BE REMEMBERED.
Let never day nor night unhallow'd pass,
But still remember what the Lord hath done.

THE DUCHESS OF GLOSTER'S REMONSTRANCE TO HER

HUSBAND WHEN DOING PENANCE.
For, whilst I think I am thy married wife,
And, thou a prince, protector of this land,
Methinks, I should not thus be led along,
Mail'd up in shame, * with papers on my baek;
And followed with a rabble, that rejoice
To see my tears, and hear my deep-feltt groans,
The ruthless flint doth cut my tender feet;
And, when I start, the envious people laugh,
And bid me be advised how I tread.

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ACT III.

SILENT, REZENTMENT DEEPEST.

Smooth runs the water, where the brook is deep; And in his simple show he harbours treason.

A GUILTY COUNTENANCE.

Upon thy eyeballs murderous tyranny
Sits in grim majesty, to fright the world.

DESCRIPTION OF A MURDERED PERSON,
See, how the blood is settled in his face!
Oft have I seen a timely-parted ghost, I.
of ashy semblance, meagre, pale, and bloodless,
Being all deseended to the labouring heart;
Who, in the conflict that it holds with death,
Attracts the same for aidance 'gainst the enemy;
Which with the heart there cools and ne'er returneth
To blush and beautify the cheek again.

Wrapped up in disgrace; alluding to the sheet of
penance.
+ Deep-fetched.

A body become inanimate in the common course of nature; to which violence has not brought a timeless end.

*

ock

But, see, his face is black, and full of blood;

| Th His eyeballs further out than when he liv'd,

17 Staring full ghastly, like a strangled man: [gling; His hair uprear’d, his nostrils stretch'd with strug. His hands abroad display'd, as one that graspid And tuggd for life, and was by strength subdu’d. Look on the sheets, his hair, you see, is sticking: His well-proportion'd beard made rough and rugged, Like to the summer's corn by tempest lodg'd. It cannot be, but he was murder'd here; The least of all these signs were probable.

A GOOD CONSCIENCE,
What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted,
Thrice is he arm’d, that hath his quarrel just;
And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel,
Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted.

REMORSELESS HATRED.
A plague upon them! Wherefore should I curse

them?
Would curses kill, as doth the mandrake's groan,
I would invent as bitter-searching terms,
As curst, as harsh, and horrible to hear,
Deliver'd strongly through my fixed teeth,
With full as many signs of deadly hate,
As lean-fac'd Envy in her loathsome care:
My tongue should stumble in mine earnest words:
Mine eyes should sparkle like the beaten flint:
My hair be fix'd on end, as one distract:
Ay, every joint should seem to curse and ban:
And even now my burden'd heart would break,
Should I not curse them. Poison be their drink!
Gall, worse than gall, the daintiest that they taste!
Their sweetest shade, a grove of cyprus trees!
Their chiefest prospect, murdering basilisks!
Their softest touch, as smart as lizards' stings!
Their music, frightful as the serpents hiss;
And boding screech-owls make the concert full!
All the foul terrors in dark-seated hell.

*

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Now, by the ground that I am banish'd from,
Well could I curse away a winter's night,

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