Writings historical. Letters

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F. C. and J. Rivington, 1819 - Philosophy
 

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Contents

ri To the lord treasurer Burghley in excuse
213
mending his first suit touching the Solicitors place
219
To the lord keeper
221
To the lord keeper
222
To the lord keeper
223
To the lord keeper
224
To the lord keeper
225
To the lord keeper ibid 30 To the lord keeper
226
To the lord keeper
227
To my lord of Esser
233
To my lord of Essex
234
To Sir John Stanhope
235
To my lord of Essex
236
To my lord of Essex
237
To my lord of Esser ibid 39 To the queen
238
To Sir Robert Cecil
239
To Sir Robert Cecil
240
To Foulk Grevil
241
my lord of Essex
242
To Sir Robert Cecil
243
A letter of advice to the earl of Essex to take upon him the care of Irish causes when Mr secretary Cecil was in France
244
nominated for the charge of Ireland
246
A letter of advice to my lord of Essex immedi ately before his going into Ireland I
248
To my lord of Esser
252
A letter framed as from the earl in answer
261
To my lord of Canterbury
270
To the earl of Northumberland recommending
271
A letter to the lord of Kinlosse upon his
277
To the earl of Southampton upon the kings
281
To Sir Thomas Bodeley upon sending his book
287
To the lord chancellor touching the History
293
Another letter to the earl of Salisbury touch
299
To the king
302
To Mr Matthew
305
To Sir George Carew on sending him the trea tise In felicem memoriam Elizabethæ
306
To the king upon presenting the Discourse touching the Plantation of Ireland
307
To the bishop of Ely upon sending his writing intitled Cogitata et visa
308
To Sir Thomas Bodeley after he had imparted to him a writing intitled Cogitata et visa
310
To Mr Matthew upon sending to him a part of Instauratio magna
318
To Mr Matthew
319
To Mr Matthew
320
To Mr Matthew upon sending his book De sapientia veterum
321
To the king
322
To the king
323
To the Prince of Wales dedicating his Essays to him
324
To the earl of Salisbury lord treasurer
325
To Sir Vincent Skinner
327
To Sir Henry Saville
328
powers
329
Of helps of the intellectual powers
332
Sir Francis Bacon to Mr Matthew about his writings and the death of a friend
335
To the king
338
To the king
342
To the king touching Peacham etc
343
To the king touching my lord chancellors re covery etc
350
To the king concerning Owens cause etc
351
justice Coke
353
To the king about a certificate of lord chief 118 To the king
354
To the king
359
To the king of revenue and profit
360
To the king
361
To the king concerning the new company
363
To Sir George Villiers about Ropers place
366
To the king ibid 125 To the king advising him to break off with the new company
369
To the king touching the chancellors sick ness
371
To the king ibid 128 A letter to the king of my lord chancellors amendment and the difference begun between the chancery and kings bench
374
To Sir George Villiers
376
To Sir George Villiers about swearing him into the privy council
377
To the king of the chancery and kings bench
378
To Sir George Villiers
387
To his majesty about the earl of Somerset ibid 135 To his majesty about the chancellors place
389
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of So merset
390
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of So merset
393
A letter to the king with his majestys obser vations upon it
395
To Sir George Villiers about the earl of So merset
398
To Sir George Villiers of Somersets arraign ment
400
To the king about Somersets examination
402
An expostulation to the lord chief justice Coke
403
To Sir George Villiers
411
To the king about the Commendams
412
A memorial for his majesty 1616
414
To the kiny of Sir George Villierss patent
445
sealed
446
To Sir George Villiers on sending his patent 159 To Sir George Villiers acknowledging the kings favour
447
To the king ibid 161 To the lord viscount Villiers
448
Reasons why the new company is not to be trusted and continued with the trade of cloths
449
To the lord viscount Villiers
451
To the lord viscount Villiers
452
To Sir Francis Bacon his majestys attorney general
453
The case of John Bertram
454
To the lord viscount Villiers
455
To the lord viscount Villiers about duels
459
To the lord viscount Villiers
462
To the earl of Buckingham
463
To the university of Cambridge
464
To the earl of Buckingham
465
To the earl of Buckingham
466
To the king about the Spanish match
467
To the earl of Buckingham
469
An account of council business and other matters
470
To the lord keeper
475
To the earl of Buckingham
476
To the king
478
To the earl of Buckingham 183 To the earl of Buckingham
481
To the king
482
To the earl of Buckingham
483
A memorial for his majesty
484
To the earl of Buckingham
486
To the earl of Buckingham
488
To the lord keeper
489
To the earl of Buckingham
491
To the king
493
To the marquis of Buckingham
495
To Mr Matthew about reading and giving judgment upon his writings
496
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 198 To the lord chancellor
499
To the lord chancellor
500
To the marquis of Buckingham
501
To the marquis of Buckingham
502
To the marquis of Buckingham
503
To the marquis of Buckingham
504
To the marquis of Buckingham
505
To the marquis of Buckingham
507
To the marquis of Buckingham
508
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 209 To the lord chancellor
510
To the marquis of Buckingham
511
To the marquis of Buckingham
514
To the marquis of Buckingham
522
To the lord chancellor
534
To the lord chancellor
541
than he found it
543
To Mr Matthew owning his impatient atten tion to do him service
544
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 252 To the marquis of Buckingham
546
To the lord chancellor
548
To the lord chancellor ibid 255 To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 256 To the king
549
To the king
550
To the kings most excellent majesty
551
To the prince of Wales
552
To the king
553
To the marquis of Buckingham
554
To the marquis of Buckingham
556
To the marquis of Buckingham
557
To the king
558
To the lord St Alban
559
To the lord St Alban
560
To the lord St Alban ibid 271 To the lord St Alban
561
To the marquis of Buckingham ibid 273 To the kings most excellent majesty
562
To the lord marquis of Buckingham high admiral of England
563
To father Redempt Baranzan
564
To the king
566
To Mr Matthew employing him to do a good office with a great man
571
An expostulation to the marquis of Buck ingham
573
To the lord St Alban
575
To the duke of Buckingham
577
To the duke of Buckingham
578
To the lord St Alban ibid 287 To the lord St Alban
579
To the lord St Alban
580
To the lord St Alban ibid 291 To the duke of Buckingham
581
To the lord treasurer Marlborough expostu lating about his unkindness and injustice
582
To the king ibid 295 In answer to the foregoing by king James
584
The bishops answer to the preceding letter
585
To the queen of Bohemia
587
A letter of the lord Bacon in French to the marquis Fiat
588

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Page 168 - your grace, that were not for mine ease : they are " most of them my retainers, that are come to do " me service at such a time as this, and chiefly to " see your grace." The king started a little, and said, " By my faith, my lord, I thank you for my " good cheer, but I may not endure to have my laws " broken in my sight: my attorney must speak with
Page 361 - Fulke Greville, servant to queen Elizabeth, counsellor to king " James, and friend to Sir Philip Sidney.
Page 154 - ... the privilege of his order ; and the pity in the common people, which if it run in a strong stream, doth ever cast up scandal and envy, made it generally rather talked than believed that all was but the king's device. But howsoever it were, hereupon Perkin, that had offended against grace now the third time, was at the last proceeded with, and by commissioners of oyer and determiner, arraigned at Westminster, upon...
Page 86 - God, and to celebrate this noble act of the king of Spain; who in this is not only victorious but apostolical, in the gaining of new provinces to the Christian faith. And the rather, for that this victory and conquest is obtained without much effusion of blood. Whereby it is to be hoped, that there shall be gained not only new territory, but infinite souls to the Church of Christ, whom the Almighty, as it seems, would have live to be converted. Herewithal he did relate some of the most memorable...
Page 109 - Chester, which ever being a kind of appendage to the principality of Wales, and using to go to the king's son, his suit did not only end in a denial, but in a distaste ; the king perceiving thereby that his desires were intemperate, and his cogitations vast and irregular, and that his former benefits were but cheap and lightly regarded by him ; wherefore the king began not to brook him well. And as a little leaven of new distaste doth commonly sour the whole lump of former merits...
Page 94 - Lastly, she raised his thoughts with some present rewards, and farther promises ; setting before him chiefly the glory and fortune of a crown, if things went well, and a sure refuge to her court, if the worst should fall. After such time as she thought he was perfect in his lesson, she began to cast with herself from what coast this blazing star should first appear, and at what time it must be upon the horizon of Ireland ; for there had the like meteor strong influence before. The time of the apparition...
Page 549 - I have brought unto you gemitum columbcz from others ; now I bring it from myself. I fly unto Your Majesty with the wings of a dove, which once within these seven days I thought would have carried me a higher flight. "When I enter into myself I find not the materials of such a tempest as is comen upon me. I have been, as Your Majesty knoweth best, never author of any immoderate counsel, but always desired to have things carried suavibus modis.
Page 207 - I confess that I have as vast contemplative ends, as I have moderate civil ends: for I have taken all knowledge to be my province...
Page 67 - For she was not only publicly contracted, but stated, as a bride, and solemnly bedded ; and after she was laid, there came in Maximilian's ambassador with letters of procuration, and in the presence of sundry noble personages, men and women, put his leg, stript naked to the knee, between the espousal sheets ; to the end, that that ceremony might be thought to amount to a consummation and actual knowledge.
Page 297 - ... stand at a stay. And surely I may not endure, in public place, to be wronged without repelling the same to my best advantage to right myself. You are great, and therefore have the more enviers, which would be glad to have you paid at another's cost.

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