International Clinics: A Quarterly of Clinical Lectures

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J.B. Lippincott., 1923 - Clinical medicine
 

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Page 60 - On each cut is placed a protein and to it is added a drop of tenth-normal sodium hydroxide solution to dissolve the protein and to permit of its rapid absorption. At the end of a half hour the proteins are washed off and the reactions are noted, always comparing the inoculated cuts with normal controls on which no protein was placed. A positive reaction consists of a raised white elevation or urticarial wheal surrounding the cut. The smallest reaction that we call positive must measure 0.5 cm. in...
Page 60 - ... as follows: A number of small cuts, each about one-eighth of an inch long, are made on the flexor surfaces of the forearm. These cuts are made with a sharp scalpel, but are not deep enough to draw blood, although they do penetrate the skin. On each cut is placed a protein and to it is added a drop of tenth-normal sodium hydroxide solution to dissolve the protein and to permit of its rapid absorption.
Page 39 - The massive type may be allowed 10 to 16 per cent, increase over the above table, but should still regulate the diet and activities to combat any tendency to increase in weight. Bear in mind that while life insurance companies have been successful in selecting a favorable class of light weights, they have not been successful in finding a favorable class of heavy weights, that is, regardless of type, thera is a certain extra death rate in any over-weight group.
Page 74 - ... lesions are often minute. The use of a hand lens may be necessary. In the absence of apparent lesions, the death of the animal is sufficient Incentive for transfer to a fresh animal. Material from the dead animal's glands, spleen, and liver, when rubbed on the shaven, abraded skin of another guinea pig or rabbit, should likewise cause its death within a week with the same typical lesions of the lymph glands, spleen, and liver, and thus the infection may be propagated for an indefinite number...
Page 5 - ... tissue cells are properly nourished by the increased diet, there is no longer the constant calling for food, hence hunger pain of the severe diabetic is replaced by normal appetite. On the increased caloric intake, the patients gain rapidly in strength and weight. With the relief of the symptoms of his disease, and with the increased strength and vigor resulting from the increased diet, the pessimistic, melancholy diabetic becomes optimistic and cheerful. Insulin is not a cure for diabetes; it...
Page 4 - ... secondarily of protein and fat. It is indisputably proven that for normal metabolism of carbohydrate in the body, adequate amounts of Insulin are essential. It follows, therefore, that the treatment consists in giving just sufficient Insulin to make up for the deficiency in the patient's pancreas. Insulin enables the severe diabetic to burn carbohydrate as shown by the rise in the respiratory quotient following the administration of glucose and Insulin. It permits glucose to be stored as glycogen...
Page 4 - ... carbohydrate as shown by the rise in the respiratory quotient following the administration of glucose and insulin. It permits glucose to be stored as glycogen in the liver for future use. The burning of carbohydrate enables the complete oxidation of fats, and acidosis disappears. The normality of blood sugar relieves the depressing thirst and consequently there is a diminished intake and output of fluid. Since the tissue cells are properly nourished by the increased diet, there is no longer the...
Page 70 - Primarily it occurs in nature as a fatal bacteremla of wild rodents, especially rabbits and hares. Secondarily it is a disease of man, transmitted from rodents to man by the bite of an infected blood-sucking fly or tick, or by contamination of his 'hands or his conjunctival sac with portions of the internal organs or with the body fluids of infected rodents, flies, or ticks.

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