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by William de Picton, a Norman knight, in the reign of William Rufus. Upon his line's becoming extinct; it descended to the Wogans, then to the Dones, and afterwards to the Phis lipses of Kylsant; and during the Civil Wars, Sir Richard Philips made a long and vigorous defence in it for King Charles. It is one of the very few castles that escaped the dilapidations of Cromwell, and is also remarkable for having been always inhabited ; yet the alterations and additions of successive occupiers have not deprived it of its embattled figure. The extensive and delightful plantations of this seat unite with those of Slebatch, a handsomxe house built by the late Mr. Barlow, and now in the possession of Mr. Philips.

In another excursion from Haverfordwest, passing Johnston, an old seat of Lord Kensington's, to the obliging communications of which nobleman I feel myself greatly indebted, we reached HUBBERSTON HAIKIN, a fishing town in Milford-haven, whence the Waterford packets depart from Britain. This is a poor place, and ill-supplied with accommodation for travellers ; but at the still smaller town of MILFORD, on the opposite side of the river, we were informed, a good inn is established. Near Habberston are the small remains of a priory, consisting chiefly of the gate-house ; but of what foundation or order no legend informs us.

town

CHAP.

C HA P.

VI.

JOURNEY OVER THE PRECELLY MOUNTAIN

TO CARDIGAN-EXTENSIVE PROSPECT

CARDIGAN-ST. DOGMAEL'S PRIORY
ANOTHER ROUTE FROM HAVERFORDWEST
TO CARDIGAN, BY ST, DAVID'S-THE CA-
THEDRAL OF ST. DAVID'S-GRAND RUINS

OF ITS PALACE-A LOGGAN, OR ROCKING

STONE-RAMSAY ISLAND-FISHGUARD

-NEWPORT

KILGARRAN CASTLE

SALMON LEAP-NEWCASTLE.

THE choice of our journey from Haverfordwest * to Cardigan was a matter of some difficulty; we were desirous of traversing the

Precelly

* From Haverfordwest, a turnpike road extends to Caermarthen, 33 miles distant. About nine miles from Haverford, and one to the left of the road, is Lawhaden castle, picturesquely seated on a bold eminence, overlooking an extensive country. This castle was the principal seat of the Bishops

af

Precelly Mountain, but could not think of leaving the ruins of St. David's unexamined. At last we bit upon the expedient of each taking a different road: my companion, having the better horse, took the circuitous route by St. David's; and I, the direct road over the mountains,

Proceeding upon this arrangement two or three miles, I halted to take a retrospective view of the country.

Haverfordwest now wore a singular appearance, with its houses piled on each other ; but, accompanied by a fine river well furnished with vessels, and by its bridge and massive castle, it presented an agreeable picture. At some distance westward, the lofty tower of Roche castle was conspicuous; and partly in the same direction, the Trogan rocks, rising from the verdure in abrupt crags, so as to be generally mistaken for stupendous ruins. Turning to the east, within a short distance appeared an of St. David's; but in the year 1616 Bishop Milborne obtained leave to dismantle it, the lead and other expensive materials having been purloined by his holy predecessors. Narbeth, a small irregular town built on a hill about 11 miles on the road, bas some inconsiderable ruins of a castle erected by Sir Andrew Perrot, whose ancestor came over at the Conquest. The road, passing through St. Clare, a pleasing village, continues onward without any particular attraction.

ancient

ancient encampment called St. LEONARD'S RATHE, crowning a bold eminence; this work is circular, and, from the height of its vallum and depth of its ditch, may be attributed to the Saxons.

As I advanced from this spot I parted with the beauties of the country: no objects of interest occurred; the unadorned views became compressed in narrow limits, until at, length they were shut up in mountainous hollows. In this dreary track stands a poor solitary house called New inn, half way be- : tween Haverford and Cardigan : however, I here obtained part of a goose for my dinner, and then proceeded up the PreceLLY MOUN

TAIN..

This mountain, reckoned the highest in South Wales, is part of a great ridge crossing Pembrokeshire in a direction East and West. On gaining the summit, a prodigious extent of prospect burst upon me.

.

In front, a wild hilly tract, yet not undiversified with patches of cultivation, stretched nearly to the northern confines of South Wales, where the pale summitof Plinlimmon, in Montgomeryshire, might be just distinguished from the atmospheric blue : more westward, beyond a vast expanse

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