The Cyropaedia: Or, Institution of Cyrus, and the Hellenics, Or Grecian History. Literally Translated from the Greek of Xenophon

Front Cover
H.G. Bohn, 1855 - Education of princes - 579 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 209 - I will not conceal from you to whom it is that I desire to go.' "He, having said this, went away with great pity for her that she should have lost such a husband, and for the man that he should have left such a wife behind him, never to see her more. Panthea then gave orders for her servants to retire, 'Till such time,' said she, 'as I shall have lamented my husband, as I please.
Page 192 - O greatest Jove, grant me to appear a husband worthy of Panthea, and a friend worthy of Cyrus who has done us so much honor!
Page 217 - Babylonians drank and revelled the whole night; on that occasion, as soon as it grew dark, took a number of men with him, and opened the ditches into the river. When this was done the water ran off in the night by the ditches, and the passage of the river through the city became passable.
Page 21 - He was able to inspire all with so great a desire of pleasing him, that they ever desired to be governed by his opinion and will.
Page 23 - The boys attending the public schools, pass their, time in learning justice; and say- that they go for this purpose, as those with us say who go to learn to read. Their presidents spend the most part of the day in dispensing justice amongst them ; for there are among the boys, as among the men, accusations for theft, robbery, violence, deceit, calumny, and other such things as naturally occur ; and such as they convict of doing wrong, in any of these respects, they punish ; ?. they punish likewise...
Page 322 - in the time of Aristophanes and Demosthenes, designated a person of a peculiar class, not capable of being described by any single word in our language, but well understood and appreciated by an Athenian. He had not much in common with our sycophant, but was a happy compound of the common barretor, informer, pettifogger, busybody, rogue, liar, and slanderer.
Page 238 - ... the meats that come from the king dressed in greater perfection : for, in little cities, the same people make both the frame of a couch, a door, a plough, and a table ; and frequently the same person is a builder too, and very well satisfied he is if he meet with customers enough to maintain him. It is impossible therefore for a man that makes a great many different things to do them all well. But in great cities, because there are multitudes that want every particular thing, one art alone...
Page 357 - ... all the instruments with which men cultivate the ground, or hew wood or stone, would serve as weapons, while the greater part of the artificers had sufficient tools to fight with, especially against unarmed enemies.
Page 26 - ... full-grown men. Those who make their progress through the order of full-grown men unexceptionably, are then enrolled among the elders ; so that the order of elders stands composed of men who have pursued their course through all things good and excellent.
Page 23 - Their presidents spend the most part of the day in dispensing justice amongst them ; for there are among the boys, as among the men, accusations for theft, robbery, violence, deceit, calumny, and other such things as naturally occur ; and such as they convict of doing wrong, in any of these respects, they punish ; they punish likewise such as they find guilty of false accusation ; they appeal to justice also in the case of a crime for which men hate one another excessively, but for which they never...

Bibliographic information