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SIGNATURES OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE UNITED COLONIES, 1646: THEOPHI

LUS EATON, John ENDECOTT, JOHN HAYNES, STEPHEN GOODYEAR, Herbert PELAAM, EDWARD HOPKINS, JOHN BROWNE, AND TIMOTHY HATHERLEY.

M. H. S. LETTER OF SAMUEL GORTON. From the Winthrop Papers, M. H. S.. · 392 SIGNATURE OF JOHN Cooke. From the Winthrop Papers, M. H. S.

394 SIGNATURES OF MARMADUKE MATTHEWS, RICHARD BLINMAN AND SAMUEL NewMAN. From the Winthrop Papers, M. H. S.

• 395 DOCUMENT OF PEREGRINE WHITE. Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth

406 MAP OF PLYMOUTH, KINGSTON AND DUXBURY HARBORS, U. S. COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY

In Pocket Cover MAP OF CAPE COD BAY, U. S. COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY. In Pocket Cover

Of Plimmoth Plantation

Anno Dom: 1627.

A

T the usuall season of the coming of ships Mr. Allerton re

turned, and brought some usfull goods with him, according

to the order given him. For upon his commission he tooke up 200li.which he now gott at.30. per cent. Thewhich goods they gott safly home, and well conditioned, which was much to the comfort and contente of the plantation. He declared unto them, allso, how, with much adoe and no small trouble, he had made a composition with the adventurers, by the help of sundrie of their faithfull freinds ther, who had allso taken much pains their about. The

· The uncertain political conditions in England accounted in a measure for the difficulties experienced by Allerton in obtaining what he desired. The Parliament dissolved June 15, 1626, after a session largely devoted to charges against the Duke of Buckingham and the defence of the privileges of members. The succeeding months saw the efforts of the King to obtain money with which to maintain a fleet of ships for the defence of the kingdom and to send another against Spanish treasure ships and transports. Charles was obliged to pay usurious rates for ready money, and to sell large quantities of the royal plate, for the grants by Parliament had been meagre, and the measures resorted to by the king did not produce sufficient to meet the demands of the long unpaid and now clamorous soldiers and sailors. Relations with France continued to be strained, as the English seized French vessels on suspicion of having Spanish cargoes, and the French sequestered English goods in France by way of reprisal. On November 24, nine days after Allerton had completed his agreement with the London Adventurers, it was known by some in England that the English and Scottish fleet of wine ships, some two hundred in number, had been seized by the Governor of Guienne, the Duke of Epernon. Reprisals and other causes of difference followed, and war between the two countries appeared inevitable.

· Allerton probably left New England early in July and returned "at the usual season of the coming of ships.” The task of making an arrangement with the Adventurers could not have been easy, in spite of the preparations made for it by Standish; or Allerton's increasing influence with the English creditors and his desire to increase his own gains, may have accounted for a good part of the difficulties alleged to have arisen. This mission of Allerton proved in the event exceptionally costly.

“Besides the obtaining of this money, he with much ado made a composition

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