From Victoria to Vladivostok: Canada?s Siberian Expedition, 1917-19

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UBC Press, May 1, 2010 - History - 352 pages
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As the last guns sounded on the Western Front, 4,200 Canadian soldiers, some of them conscripts, travelled from Victoria to Vladivostok to open a new theatre of war in Siberia. Part of the Allied intervention in Russia’s civil war, the force sought to defeat Bolshevism, but grim conditions, conflict among the Allies, and local opposition eventually forced Canada to evacuate the troops.

This groundbreaking book brings to a life a forgotten chapter in the history of Canada and Russia. Combining military and labour history with the social history of British Columbia, Qu?bec, and Russia, Benjamin Isitt examines how the Siberian Expedition exacerbated tensions within Canadian society at a time when a radicalized working class, many French-Canadians, and even the soldiers themselves objected to Canada’s military adventure designed to alter the outcome of the Russian Revolution. The result is a highly readable and provocative work that challenges public memory of the First World War while illuminating tensions – both in Canada and worldwide – that shaped the course of twentieth-century history.

 

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Contents

Why Siberia?
1
The Road to Intervention
53
Mobilization
72
Departure Day
96
111
111
Up Country and Evacuation
135
Afterword
158
Notes
185
Bibliography
259
Index
275
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About the author (2010)

Benjamin Isitt is a historian specializing in twentieth-century Canadian and world history, with emphasis on labour, social movements, and the process of cultural change.

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