Fire Canoes: Steamboats on Great Canadian Rivers

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Heritage House Publishing Co, 2012 - History - 141 pages
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Anson Northup, the first steamboat on the Canadian prairies, arrived in Fort Garry in 1859. Belching hot sparks and growling in fury, it was called "fire canoe" by the local Cree. The first steam-powered passenger vessel in Canada had begun service on the St. Lawrence River in 1809, and for the next 150 years, steamboats carried passengers and freight on great Canadian rivers, among them the treacherous Stikine and Fraser in British Columbia; the Saskatchewan and Red Rivers on the prairies; and the mighty St. Lawrence and Saguenay in Ontario and Quebec.

Travel back in time aboard makeshift gold-rush riverboats on the Yukon, sternwheelers on the Saskatchewan and luxurious liners on the St. Lawrence to the decades when steamboats sent the echoes of whistles across a vast land of powerful rivers.

 

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Contents

prologue
13
FIRE CANOES
14
An American
20
Peter McArthurs Fleet
27
The Greyhound of the Saskatchewan
36
Steamboats at War on the Prairies
43
The Red River Flood of 1897
51
Problems on the Saskatchewan Rivers
68
North toward the Arctic
90
Steamboats in Ontario
109
The Saguenay River
116
Steam on the Majestic St Lawrence River
121
EPILOGUE
134
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
136
INDEX
138
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
141

Tramp Steamers on the Prairies
74

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About the author (2012)

Anthony Dalton is the author of numerous books on maritime history including The Graveyard of the Pacific, The Fur-Trade Fleet, Alone against the Arctic, and Sir John Franklin. He is a fellow of both the Royal Geographical Society and the Royal Canadian Geographical Society and is past-president of the Canadian Authors Association. He lives in Tsawwassen, British Columbia.

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