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ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE

1. PORTRAIT OF POPE-Frontispiece. 2. POPE'S TOWER, MAPLEDURHAM-Title-page. 3. PORTRAIT OF MRS. POPE . . . . . . 1 4. POPE's HOUSE AT BINFIELD . . . . . . . 14 5. POPE (WHEN YOUNG) FIRST SEES DRYDEN AT WILL'S

COFFEE-HOUSE . . . . . . to face 22 6. POPE AND SIR JOSHUA REYNOLDS IN AN AUCTION ROOM .. 7. PORTRAIT OF WYCHERLEY . . . . . . : 31 8. PORTRAIT OF WALSH . . . . . . . . 34 9. PORTRAIT OF TONSON . . . . . . . 47 10. PORTRAIT OF DENNIS, BY HOGARTH 11. MAPLEDURHAM HOUSE . . . 12. PORTRAIT OF ADDISON . . . . . . . . 91 13. BUSHY PARK

. . . . . . . . 132 14. PORTRAIT OF LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGU . . . 134 15. POPE AND MARY LEPELL . . . . . to face 135 16. EAC-STVILE OF POPE's HANDWRITING. . . . . 161 17. PORTRAIT OF ATTERBURY . . 18. POPE'S VILLA . . . . . . . . . 167 19. POPE'S SKETCH OP HIS GROTTO .. 20. CHAPEL, STANTON HARCOURT . . . . . . 185 21. DAWLEY, THE SEAT OF LORD BOLINGBROKE . . . . 227 22. PORTRAIT OF ELIJAH FENTON . . . . . . 233 PAGE 23. CROWD OF AUTHORS BESIEGING THE PUBLISHERS TO PRE

VENT THE PUBLICATION OF THE DUNCIAD . to face 264 24. PORTRAIT OF DR. T. WARTON . . . . . . 299 25. PORTRAIT OF ARBUTHNOT. . . . . . . 310 26. VIEW IN BATH . . . . . . . · · 369 27. POPE AT LORD COBHAM'S, AT STOWE . . . to face 376 28. POPE ON THE THAMES, AT TWICKENHAM . to face 381 29. POPE SURROUNDED BY HIS FRIENDS, A SHORT TIME BEFORE

HIS DEATH . . . . . . . to face 388 30. PORTRAIT OF LORD LYTTELTON

·

· 402 31. MONUMENT TO POPE IN TWICKENHAM CHURCH . . . 404 32. FAC-SIMILE OF THE ONLY FULL-LENGTH PORTRAIT OF POPE . 407 33. BUST OF POPE BY ROUBILIAC . . . . . . 417 34. PLAN OF Pope's GARDEN . . . . . . . 446

LIFE OF POPE.

CHAPTER I.

[1688–1708.]

POPE'S BIRTH, FAMILY, AND EDUCATION. HIS EARLY FRIENDS, SIR WILLIAM

TRUMBULL, WYCHERLEY, WALSH, AND HENRY CROMWELL.

THE death of Dryden, on the 1st of May, 1700, left the poetical throne of England vacant, with no prospect of an immediate or adequate successor. His dominion had often been disputed, and was assailed to the last; but as every year strengthened his claims, and as the latter portion of his life was the most rich and glorious of his literary career, his adversaries ultimately withdrew or became powerless, and his supremacy was firmly established. The magnificent funeral of the poet, though a gaudy and ill-conducted pageant, had a moral that penetrated through the folds of ceremony-it was & public recognition of merits which every effort of envy, faction, and caprice, had been employed to thwart and contemn. And posterity has amply ratified this acknowledgment of the services of the great national poet. Dryden inherited the faults and vices of his age, and he wanted the higher sensibilities, the purity of taste, and lofty moral feeling that dignify the poet's art. But even when sinning with his contemporaries he soared far above them, and his English nature at length overcame his French tastes and the fashion of the Court. His sympathies had a wider and nobler range ; his conceptions were clear and masculine ; and no one approached him in command of the stores of our language-whether

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