Elidure and Edward: Two Historical Dramatic Sketches

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Thomas Davison, 1825 - Electronic book - 125 pages
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Page xi - York ; and from his own head, places the crown on the head of his brother. Who thenceforth, vice itself dissolving in him, and forgetting her firmest hold with the admiration of a deed so heroic, became a true converted man ; ruled worthily ten years, died, and was buried in Caerleir. Thus was a brother saved by a brother, to whom love of a crown, the thing that so often dazzles and vitiates mortal men, for which thousands of nearest blood have destroyed each other, was, in respect of brotherly dearness,...
Page xi - Afterwards feigning himself sick, summons all his peers, as about greatest affairs, where admitting them one by one, as if his weakness endured not the disturbance of more at once, causes them, willing or unwilling, once more to swear allegiance to Archigallo. Whom, after reconciliation made on all sides, he leads to York: and, from his head, places the crown on the head of his brother. Who thenceforth...
Page xi - Elidure, the next brother, surnamed the Pious, was set up in his place : a mind so noble, and so moderate, as almost is incredible to have been ever found. For, having held the sceptre five years, hunting one day in the forest of Calater, he chanced to meet his deposed brother, wandering in...
Page xi - Callater, he chanced to meet his deposed brother wandering in mean condition, who had been long in vain beyond the seas importuning foreign aids to his restorement, and was now in a poor habit, with only ten followers, privately returned to find subsistence among his secret friends. At the unexpected sight of him, Elidure, himself also then but thinly...
Page 11 - Bright was the promise of their early youth. Archillego was ardent and courageous, Impetuous, not implacable his nature ; But Elidure was all a mother's soul, In its proud fancy's fondest dream, could frame.
Page 56 - Yes ! we will note it as a tale gone by, Yet full of matter for our future warning. Thou shalt instruct me how calamity Tutors the soul ; — I knew that it would make thee The wisest, purest, best, of human kind.

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