The Works of William Paley ...: Comprising the Additional Volume of Sermons First Published in 1825, with a Memoir of His Life : Complete in Six Volumes, Volume 1

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Hilliard and Brown, 1830 - Sermons
 

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Page 248 - Our first proposition, and that which we have hitherto been defending, was, ' that, in a vast plurality of instances, in which contrivance is perceived, the design of the contrivance is beneficial.' Our second proposition is, ' that the Deity has added pleasure to animal sensations, beyond what was necessary for any other purpose, or when the purpose, so far as it was necessary, might have been effected by the operation of pain.
Page 236 - A bee amongst the flowers in spring is one of the most cheerful objects that can be looked upon. Its life appears to be all enjoyment ; so busy, and so pleased ; yet it is only a specimen of insect life, with which, by reason of the animal being half domesticated, we happen to be better acquainted than we are with that of others.
Page 111 - Let him study the Holy Scriptures, especially the New Testament. Therein are contained the words of eternal life. It has God for its Author ; salvation for its end ; and truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter.
Page 241 - No anatomist ever discovered a system of organization calculated to produce pain and disease; or, in explaining the parts of the human body, ever said : This is to irritate, this to inflame...
Page 85 - The aorta of a whale is larger in the bore than the main pipe of the water works at London Bridge ; and the water roaring in its passage through that pipe, is inferior, in impetus and velocity, to the blood gushing from the whale's heart.
Page 9 - I knew to the contrary, it had lain there for ever ; nor would it perhaps be very easy to show the absurdity of this answer. But suppose I had found a watch upon the ground, and it should be inquired how the watch happened to be in that place : I should hardly think of the answer which I had before given, — that, for anything I knew, the watch might have always been there.
Page 15 - Contrivance must have had a contriver; design, a designer; whether the machine immediately proceeded from another machine or not. That circumstance alters not the case. That other machine may, in like manner, have proceeded from a former machine: nor does that alter the case; contrivance must have had a contriver. That former one from one preceding it: no alteration still; a contriver is still necessary.
Page 15 - ... an infinite number of links, can no more support itself, than a chain composed of a finite number of links. And of this we are assured (though we never can have tried the experiment,) because, by increasing the number of links, from ten for instance to a hundred, from a hundred to a thousand, &c. we make not the smallest approach, we observe not the smallest tendency, towards self-support.
Page 10 - ... a different size from what they are, or placed after any other manner, or in any other order, than that in which they are placed, either no motion at all would have been carried on in the machine, or none which would have answered the use that is now served by it.
Page 212 - ... to deny a personal agent. Now that which can contrive, which can design, must be a person. These capacities constitute personality, for they imply consciousness and thought. They require that which can perceive an end or purpose, as well as the power of providing means and directing them to their end.

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