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ne

Menzie, s. meaney, retinue, com Nonce, purpose; for the nonce, pany.

for the occasion. Melliger, f. messenger.

Norse, s. Norway. Minny, s. mot ber.

Nou, now. Mirke, s. dark, black.

Nout; nocht, s. nought ; also, not. Mirry, s. meri, merry.

Nout, p. 10, seems for Miskaryed, miscarried.

mought.' Mister, s. to need.

Nowght, nongbr. Mo, moe, more.

Nowls, noddles, beads. Moiening, by rneans of, fr. Noye, p. 22,0.175, annoy ; query.. Mome, a dull, fupid person. Nozt, nought, not, p. 20. Mone, moon.

Nyzt, night. More, mure,

S. moor, beatb, marsoy ground; also wild bill, p. 4, mores ant the fenne, q.

d. bill and dale. Morne, p. 75, to morn, to more

Ocht, s. ought. row : in the morning.

Oferlyng, superior, paramount ; Mornyng, p.45, mourning.

opposed to underling, p. 4. Mote I thee, migłt I thrive. On, p. 45, one, an. Mowe, may; mou, s. mouth.

On-lot, p. 18, aloft. Muchele boft, mickle boast, great Onys, once boaft.

Or, ere, before. Mude, s. mood.

Orisons, s: prayers,f oral(ons. Mulne, mill.

Ou, oure, p. 7, you, you , bicho Murne, murnt, murning, mourn, mourned, mourning.

Out alas! exclamation of g'ief. Myzt, myzty, might, mighty. Out owre, s. out over.

Owene; dwell, ain, s. owilo

Owre, s. over,
N.

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P.

Natheless,

nevertheless.
Near, s. ner, nere, ne'er, never.
Neat, oxen, cows, large cattle.
Neatherd, a keeper of cattle.
Neatresse, a female ditto.
Nere, p. 276, ne were; were it

not for.
Neft, nyest, next, nearest.
Noble, a gold coin in value 20

groats, or 6s. 8d.
Nollys, p. 17, noddles, beads.
Nom, p. 8, took. Nome, name.
Non, none. None, noori.

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Petye, pity.

Rariteil, s. p. 61, were merry. Vid. Peyni. pain.

Gl. to Gent. Shepherd.
Pibrociis, s. ligbland war-tunes. Rauglit, reacheid, gained, obtained.
Pluşanıl, s playing.

Razt, raught, or p. 22, roft, be-
Pļeti, s. platied.

reft. Plyz', pligbt.

Re:'me, reaume, realın. Plou mell, p. 21, a small wooden Rede, redde, p. 9, read,

bummer occafional y fired to the Rece, read, p. 31, alvise, advice. plow, fill ujed in the Noribi in Rehelle, p.71, care, lubour. ibe miillund counties iz its ficaid is Refe, reve, reeve, bailiff. usei a pluw-huttlet.

Reit, bereuve, or perhaps, rive, l'oli cat, a cunt word for a I pore.

Split, P.
Polys, poulli, peh, beuued Reid, s. advise.
Foudered, p. 19, term in Hc- Remeid, s remeily.

vallis', for Sprinkled over. Rescous, rescues. Powlis, polls, Leads.

Reve, p. 19, bereave, deprive. l'rayle-folk, p

Revers, s. robbers, pirates, rovers. Pielt, f. rewly.

Rew, s. take pity. Priefe, p. 3, prove.

Rewith, regrets, has reason to rePiiving, . pruting, buffing. pent. Prove, p 42, pof.

Rin, s. run. Prude, P.4, priue. It proud. Rise, p. 278, Shoot, bus, forub. Puing, s. pulling

Rive, p. 281, rife, abounding. Purchaled, p. 12, procured. Rcod loft, the place in the church Purvayed, provide.

where the images were fit up.
Rudd, ruduliness, complexion.
Rude, s. rood, crefs.
Ruell-tones, p. 18, perhaps bones

diverfly coloured, f. riolè, mor Quat, s. quitted.

perhaps small bune-rirgs, from Quaint, p. 229 cunning; p 247, the fr. rouelle, a small ring or nice, fantastical.

hoop. Cotgrav Diction. Quel, P 125, 610l, murdergus. Rugged, p.23, pulled with vioQuilles, quibbies, lo tibet. lence. S. Wbile.

Ruthy, s. p.78, pould be rashy Qiyl, s. quite:

gair, ruhiy fuff; ground coQwyknit, s. quickened, reflored to vered with ruflies. life.

Ruthe, p. 42, pity; p. 206, whe,
Ryschys, p. 23, rulles,

Rywe, rue.
R.

Ryzt, right.

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Quile,

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OUS,

Saif, s. fave, Savely, safely. Shrew,abad, an ill-temper'd perfon. Saisede, seized.

Shirive, confess; Item, hear cone' Say, p. 28, afay, attempt.

fefion. Scant, scarce.

Slynand, s. shining. Schall, hall,

Shurting, recreation, diversion, Schattered, hattered,

Puftime, p. 15. Vid. Gaw. Dougl. Schaw, s. soow.

Glod Schene, S. fbeen, fining ; Alfa Shunted. fkunned. brightness.

Sich, sic, s. fucb, Sich, s. figo Schiples, s. foipless.

Side, s. long Scho, s. foe.

Sindle, s. seldom. Schuke, s. fhook.

Sitteth, p. 3. fit ye. Sclat, hate, p. 12, little table. Skaith, scath, barm mischief. book of Nates to write upon.

Skalk, p. 124, perhaps from Scomfit, discomfit.

the Gerni. Schalck, maliciScot, tax, revenue. P. 5, a

perverse. (Sic Dan. year's tax of the kingdom ; Skalck, Nequitia, malicia, also foot, reckoning.

&c. Sheringham de Angl. Se, sene, seying; see, feen, Orig. pi 318.)- Or perhaps seeing

from the Germ. Schalchen, See, seer, s. sea, seas.

to Squint. Hence our Northern Sek. fack, p. 18.

tuord, skelly, to Squint. Sely, seely, filly, fimple.

Skinker, one that serves drink. Selven, self.

Skomfit, discomfit. Selver, filler, s. silver,

Skott, fout, reckoning. Sen, s. fince.

Slattered, Nit, broke into spline Senvy, mustard-seed, f. fenvie. Seve, p. 281, seven.

Sle, Nea, fley, no, flay. Sey yow, p. 11, say to, tell Slee, s. pay, also sy. you.

Sund, a present, a fending, Seyd, s. saw,

Sone, soon, p. 9. Foon. Shave, p. 69, be save, been Sonn, p. 278. son, sun. Noaven.

Soth, sooth, truth; also, true. Sheeve, shive, a great slice or Soothly, truly. luncheon of bread, p. 245.

Sould, s. suld, jould. (p. 17.) Shirt of male, or mail, was a Souling, p. 246. vi&tualling.

garment for defence made all Sowle is still used in the north of rings of iron, worn under for anything eaten with the coat. According to some, bread. A. S. Sufle, Sufle.

the Hawberk was so formed. Joh. 21. 5. (or a fowle, may Sho, s. je.

be from the French word Shope, p. 273, betook me, haped saouler "

to fuff and cram,

19 glut.vid. Cotgrave.) Shorte, s. Noorten.,

Sowne, sound, p.47. (rhythmi go ) Shreward, a male farew.

S;pec, fpak, spack, s. Spake.
Speere, P. 135. ride locum.

ters.

my course.

VOL. II.

Dd

Spcered;

or rather

Scot.

mean

Speered, sparred, i. e. faftuned, tree,

or

any other thing, clinging fuc*vid p. 135.

to it with the legs, and arms; Speir, s. speer, spear.

as bath been suggested by an Speir, s. (p. 62.) speer, speare, ingenious Correspondent.

ask, inquire, Vid. Glof. vol 3. Swaird, the grally surface of the Spence, spens, expence.

ground. Spindles and whorles, the in. Swearde, swerd, sword. Aruments used for Spinning in Swevens, dreams. Scotland, inftead of spinning. Swypyng, P: 22, Striking faff; qubecls t.

(Cimb. suipan, cito agere, Spilt, s. Spoilt.

Scourging,' from Spole, poulder, f. espaule. volvere, raptare.] P. 193, it seems to

Sweap, to scourge, Vid Glol. arm.pit."

to Gaw. Douglas. Sporeles, spurless, without spurs. Swepyls, p. 21, A Swepyl is Stalwart, Italworth, stout.

that faff of the fail, with Startopes, buskins, or balf-boor which the corn is beaten out,

worn by rustics, laced down vulg. a Supple: (called in, before.

tbt midland counties à SwindStead, stede, place.

gell; where obe orber part is Steir, s. fir.

termed the Hand. Aaff.)
Stel, feel, steilly, s. ficely. Swinkers, labourers.
Stound, time, a stound, while, Swyving, wboring.
Stown. s. ftolen.

Swyke, sigh.
Stoup of weir, p. 104, a pillar of Syns, fince, Syne, s. then

Syshemell, p. 66. Ifmael.
Strike, p. 12, stricken.

Sych, fucb. Stra, Atrae, s. fraw,

Syth, fince.
Styrt, fart:

Syzt, fight.
Suthe, swith, foon, quickly.
Suore bi ys chin, sworn by ķis

T.
cbin.
Sware, fiearing, oath,

Take, p. 25, taken. Swa, sa, fo.

Taiken, s. p. 108, token, fign. Skarvde, swarved, climed; or, as Targe, target, fhield.

it is now expressed in the mid- Te, to; te make, p. 3, to make. land counties, Swarmed: To Te he! interjection of laughing. swarm, is to draw oneself up a Tent, s. becd.

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* So in an old “ Treatyse agaynst Pesilence, &c. 4to Emprynted " by Wynkyn de Worde:” we are exhorted to " SPERE (i, e shut “ or bar]the wyndowes ayenft the south.” fol. 5.

+ THE ROCK, SPINDLES, and WHORLES, are very much used in Sotland and the northern parts of Northumberland at this time, The thread for shoe-makrs, and even some linen-webs, and all the twine of which the Tweed Salmon-nets are made, are spun upon SPINDLES. They are said to make a more even and smooth thread than Spinning-wheels.

Mr. LAMBE,

Terry,

eye upon her.

the.

Terry, diminutive of Thierry.

So in the North they say, Theodoricus, Didericus. Lat. o that's a Trump,” ii e also of Terence.

lie. Sbe goes about trumpTha, P, 22, tbem, Thalı, though. “ing, i.e. telling lies. Thare, theire, ther, thore, there. Trumps made of a tree. p. 21) The, thee.

perhaps wocden trumpets :" The God, p. 25, seems contract musical instruments fit enough

ed for The he, i. e. bigh God. for a mock turnament. The, thee, thrive.

So mole Tuke gusle keip, s. kept a close thee, p. 88, So may I tbrive*. Tbii, p. 281, they.

Turnes a crah, fc. at the fire: Thi fone, p. 9, thy for.

roats a crab. Thilke, this.

Twritle twist, s. p. 101, the. Thir. s. this, tbefe.

rougbly twisted : twijital," Thir towmonds, s. these twelve twirled twift.f. tortille.

months. Tho, then, p. 33, tho

V. Thole; tholed, suffer; Suffered. Thoult, thou falt or shouldeft. Vair, Somersetsb. Dialea, fair. Thrang, s. throng, close.

Valzient, s. valiant.
Thrawis, s. tbroes.

Uch, each.
Thirtti thousent, thirty thousand. Vive, p. 281, Somerset. five.
Thrie, s. thre, three.

Unfeeled, p.

oferied; a term Thrif, thrive.

in Falconry. Thruch, throuch, s. through. Unmufit, s. undisturbed, unconi Thud, p. 108, noise of a fall.

founded. perb, unmuvit. Tibbe. In Scotland Tibbe is Untonfie, s. unlucky unfortunate,

the diminutive of Isabel. Vriers, Som, friers, p. 296, 117 Tild down, p. 279. pitched. gl. is Vicars, in PCC) Till, s. to p. 16. when. query. Uthers, s. others. Timkin, diminutive of Timotby. Vazen, Som, probably for faithen, Tint, s. loft.

i.e. faiths; as boufen, clofen, &r. To, too. Too-fall, s. p. 380, twilight.

W.
Traiterye, treafun.
Trie, s. tre, tree,
Trichard, treacherous, f. tri- Wad, . would.

Wa,s. p. 97, way, p. 216, wall. cheur. Vid. p. 3. Tricthen, trick, deceive. Ibid.

Wallowit, s. faded, withered. Trough, trouth, trotb.

Wame, s. wimb. Trow, think, believe, trufi.

Wan neir, s. drew near. Trumped, p. 15; boasted, told

Wanrufe, s. uneasy. bragging lies, lying flories. * So in Chaucer, palim. Canterb. Tales, Vol. I. p. 308.

« God let him never the. po “ Toofall of the Night," seems to be an image drawn from a sufe pended canopy, so let fall as to cover what is below. [Mr, LAMBR.]

War

Wainte, waggon,

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