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XIX.

THE LUNATIC LOVER,

MAD SONG THE THIRD,

is given from an old printed copy in the British Museum, compared with another in the Depys collection; both in black letter,

GRIN

RIM king of the ghosts, make hafte,

And bring hither all your train;
See how the pale moon does waste,

And just now is in the wane.
Come, you night-hags, with all your charms, 5

And revelling witches away,
And hug me close in your arms ;.

To you my respects I'll pay.

10

I'll court you, and think you fair,

Since love does distract my brain :
I'll go, I'll wed the night-mare,

And kiss her, and kiss her again :

But

1

But if she prove peevish and proud,

Then, a pise on her love ! let her go ; I'll seek me a winding shroud,

And down to the shades below.

IS

A lunacy fad I endure,

Since reason departs away ; I call to those hags for a cure

As knowing not what I say. The beauty, whom I do adore,

Now slights me with scorn and disdain ; I never shall see her more ;

Ah! how shall I bear my pain!

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I ramble, and range about

To find out my charming faint; While she at my grief does flout,

And smiles at my loud complaint. Diftraction I see is my doom,

Of this I am now too sure; A rival is got in mytoom,

While torments I do endure.

30

Strange fancies do fill my head,

While wandering in despair, I am to the defaris lead,

Expecting to find her there,

35

Methinks

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To the elysian shades I post

In hopes to be freed from care,
Where many a bleeding ghost

Is hovering in the air.

XX.

THE LADY DISTRACTED WITH LOVE,

MAD SONG THE FOURTH,

was originally fing in one of Tom D'URFEY's comedies of Don Quixote acted in 1694 and 1696; and probably composed by himself. In the several stanzas, the author represents his pretty Mad-woman as 1. fuddenly mat: 2. mirthfully mad : 3. melancholy mad: 4. fantastically mad: and 5. stark mad. Both this, and Num. XXII. are printed from D'urfey's Pills to purge Melancholy,' 1719, vol. I.

ROM rosie bowers, where sleeps thie god of love,

Hither ye little wanton cupids fly;
Teach me in soft melodious strains to move

With tender pallion my heart's darling joy:
Ah! let the foul of musick tune my voice,
To win dear Strephon, who my soul enjoys.

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Or, if more influencing

Is to be brisk and airy, With a step and a bound, With a frisk from the ground,

I'll trip like any fairy.

As once on Ida dancing

Were three celestial bodies :
With an air, and a face,
And a shape, and a grace,

I'll charm, like beauty's goddess.

13

Ah ! 'tis in vain! 'tis all, 'tis all in vain!
Death and despair must end the fatal pain :
Cold, cold despair, disguis'd like frow and rain,
Falls on my breast; bleak winds in tempests blow; 20
My veins all hiver, and my fingers glow :

My pulse beats a dead march for loft repose,
And to a solid lump of ice my poor fond heart is froze.

Or say, ye powers, my peace to crown,
Shall I thaw myself, and drown

Among the foaming billows ?
Increasing all with tears I Thed,

On beds of ooze, and crystal pillows,
Lay down, lay down my lovefick head?

30

No, no, l'll ftrait run mad, mad, mad,

That foon my heart will warm;

When

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