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And as they shall reply,
Give each of them the lye.

45

Tell wit, how much it wrangles

In tickle points of nicenelle;
Tell wisedome, the entangles
Herfelfe in over-wiseneffe ;

And if they do reply,
Straight give them both the lye.

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Tell arts, they have no soundneffe,

But vary by esteeming;
Tell schooles, they want profoundnesse,

And fand too much on seeming:

If arts and schooles reply,
Give arts and schooles the lye.

:: 65

1

Tell faith, it's fled the citie;

Tell how the countrey erreth ;
Tell, manhood shakes off pitie;
Tell, vertue least preferreth:

And, if they doe reply,
Spare not to give the lye.

70

So, when thou hast, as I

Commanded thee, done blabbing,
Although to give the lye
Deferves no less than stabbing,

Yet stab at thee who will,
No stab the soule can kill.

75

V.

VERSES BY KING JAMES I.

In the first edition of this book were inserted, by way of Specimen of his majesty's poetic talents, fome Punning Verses made on the disputations at Sterling : but it having been suggested to the editor, that the king only gave the

quibbling

X 4

quibbling commendations in profe, and that some obsequious court-rhymer put them into metre *; it was thought proper to exchange them for two SONNETS of K. James's own composition. James was a great verifier, and therefore out of the multitude of his poems, we have here selected two, which (to Shew our impartiality) are written in his best and his worst manner, The first would not dishonour any writer of that time; the second is a most complete example of the Bathos.

A SONNET ADDRESSED BY KING JAMES TO HIS

son Prince HENRY: From K. James's works in folio: Where is also printed another called his Majesty's own Sonnel; it would perhaps be 100 cruel to infer from thence that this was not his Majesty's own Sonnet.

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GOP gives not kings the file of Gods in vaine

,

OD

For on his throne his scepter do they swey :
And as their subjects ought them to obey,
So kings hould feare and serve their God againe.

If then ye would enjoy a happie reigne,

Observe the statutes of our beavenly king ;

And from his law make all your laws to spring;
Since his lieutenant hure

ye

should remaine.

Rewarde the just, be stedfaít, true and plaine ;

Repreile the proud, maintayning aye the right;

Wake always fo, as ever in his light,
Who guards the godly, plaguing the prophane.

* See a folio intitled The Muses welcome to King James,"

And

And fo ye shall in princely vertues shine,
Refeinbling right your mightie king divine.

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A SONNET OCCASIONED BY THE BAD WEATHER
WHICH HINDRED THE SPORTS AT NEW.

MARKET IN JANUARY 1616.

This is printed from Drummond of Hawthornden's works, folio: where also may be seen some verses of Lord Stirling's upon this Sonnet, which concludes with the finest Anticlimax I remember to bave seen.

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LOW cruelly these catives do confpire?

What loathsome love breeds such a baleful band
Betwixt the cankred king of Creta land *,
That melancholy old and angry fire,

And him, who wont to quench debate and ire

5 Among the Romans, when his ports were clos’dt?

But now his double face is still dispos’d,
With Saturn's help, to freeze us at the fire.

The earth ore-covered with a sheet of fnow,
Refuses food to fowl, to bird, and beast :

10
The chilling cold lets every thing to grow,
And furfeits cattle with a starving feast.

Curs'd be that love and mought I continue short,
Which kills all creatures, and doth spoil our sport.

* Saturn.

+ Janus

fiic. may it.

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