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the only towns in the area. Railroads and several improved highways serve the area.

There have been no existing Federal projects in this vicinity. The Work Projects Administration in 1939 supplied some funds to aid in clearing out the di.ch from Prairie du Rocher to the Mississippi River. The drainage and levee district was organized in 1917 to protect 2,000 acres of land. Improvements constructed consisted of one-half mile of levees and 5 miles of ditches.

Floods occur about once every 18 months, and cause damage to crops, and to less extent to highways, railways, bridges, and farm property. The average annual flood damage is estimated at $120,900. The maximum floods of recent record occurred in May-June 1943 and April 1944.

The plan of improvement provides for the construction of a levee along the south bank of the present channel of Prairie du Rocher Creek from the bluffs near the town to the Mississippi River, thence along the high bank of the Mississippi River to the Kaskaskia River, thence along north bank of latter stream to bluffs near Root, Ill., a distance of 16 miles.

The CHAIRMAN. Show us Prairie du Rocher on this map, and where is the Mississippi River on the map, and what is there at present to protect that area?

Colonel HERB. About one-half mile of levees and 5 miles of ditches constitute the only protection there at the present time.

The CHAIRMAN. And when did you say the WPA funds were made available?

Colonel HERB. In 1939, for cleaning out the ditches from Prairie du Rocher to the Mississippi River.

The CHAIRMAN. What is your proposal now? Colonel HERB. To construct the levee along the south bank of the present channel of the Prairie du Rocher Creek from bluffs near the town to the Mississippi River, thence along the high bank of the Mississippi River to the Kaskaskia River, thence along the north bank of the latter stream to bluffs near Root, Ill., a distance of 16 miles.

The CHAIRMAN. Very well, sir. What areas will be embraced ?

Colonel HERB. The area protected, as I recall it, is about 16,000 acres.

The CHAIRMAN. Is there a railroad there?
Colonel HERB. Yes, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. Will you point that railroad out on the map ? What do you propose to do with that?

Colonel HERB. Bridge alterations are required to permit uninterrupted service on the Missouri Pacific during high-water periods.

The CHAIRMAN. What about your highways?

Colonel HERB. A stop-log structure would be provided where State Highway No. 155 crosses the north flank levee.

The CHAIRMAN. Will you have to bother about other railroads?

Colonel HERB. No, sir. The crossings over the south flank levee along the Kaskaskia are above the proposed levee grades.

The CHAIRMAN. Any railway relocation involved?
Colonel HERB. No, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. Any highway?
Colonel HERB. No highway relocation involved.

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The CHAIRMAN. The local interests will furnish the rights-of-way for the project ?

Colonel HERB. Yes, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. They are to furnish the rights-of-way for the levees?

Colonel HERB. Yes, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. Will the interior drainage be by gravity or by pumps ?

Colonel HERB. It will be by gravity, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. Where will the waters that originate in that 16,000 acres go—how will it get out of there?

Colonel HERB. It flows into the existing streams, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. I am sure it does—but you have got the Mississippi levee, haven't you? How are you going to get the water out of there?

Colonel HERB. There would be drainage structures along with these levees which would provide for the interior drainage.

The CHAIRMAN. You mean floodgates?

Colonel HERB. Yes, sir. It is proposed to use corrugated metal pipe with seepage collars to act as sluice gates.

The CHAIRMAN. The construction of pumping plants would cost the Government more than mere outlets?

Colonel HERB. Yes, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. There is nothing in this report to indicate that either on this project or the preceding one that there is any pumping. Tre there any pumping plants contemplated?

General CRAWFORD. No, sir. The first cost of the project contains an item in the amount of $215,000 which is set up for drainage structures, at Federal costs. No pumping plants are contemplated.

The CHAIRMAN. Is there any cost with respect to high ways involved in there? I believe I have asked that.

Colonel HERB. No sir, highway relocations are not involved. As I mentioned before, one stop log structure will be provided.

The CHAIRMAN. And none with respect to railways?

Colonel HIERB. No sir, just the bridge alteration for the Missouri Pacific line.

The CHAIRMAN. What about other utilities—any cost with respect to ather utilities?

Colonel HERB. No, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. And that will protect the railroads there?
General CRAWFORD. Yes, sir.

Colonel HERB. The first cost of the project is estimated at $2,627,000. The non-Federal costs is $52,000. The ratio of costs to benefits is 1.0 to 2.18.

The CHAIRMAN. Are there any existing levees along there at the present?

Colonel HERB. Local interests have constructed about one-half mile of levees.

The CHAIRMAN. Wiul you set them back generally or not?

Colonel HERB. No, sir, that levee is west of the proposed improvement.

The CHAIRMAN. The only other proposed work was the cleaning out and clearing of a channel?

Colonel Herb. Yes, sir. Cleaning out the ditch.
The CHAIRMAN. Any other statement with respect to that?

I would like for you in your revision of your remarks to be sure to advise us whether there are pumping plants there or drainage? In other words, the committee wants to be able to advise the Congress and the country that we are treating all of these areas substantially the same.

Colonel HERB. Yes, sir.

(The report of the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors and of the Chief of Engineers together with the comments of the Governor of Illinois are as follows:)

WAR DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,

Washington, April 17, 1946. The CHAIRMAN, COMMITTEE ON FLOOD CONTROL,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: 1. The Committee on Flood Control, House of Representatives, by resolution adopted September 18, 1944, requested the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors to review the report on the Mississippi River between Coon Rapids Dam and the mouth of the Ohio River, printed in House Document No. 669, Seventy-sixth Congress, third session, with a view to determining whether any modifications therein are desirable at the present time with particular reference to providing flood protection in the reach between the mouth of Kaskaskia River and the Fort Chartres and Ivy Landing drainage and levee district with particular reference to the town of Prairie du Rocher in Randolph County, Ill. I enclose the report of the Board in response thereto.

2. After full consideration of the reports secured from the district and division engineers, the Board recommends adoption of a project for the protection of the area between Prairie du Rocher Creek and Kaskaskia, River, Ill., consisting of levees and appurtenant works, generally in accordance with the plans of the district engineer and with such modifications as in the opinion of the Secretary of War and the Chief of Engineers may be deemed advisable, at an estimated first cost to the United States of $2,575,000 subject to the provision that local interests give assurances satisfactory to the Secretary of War that they will : (a) provide without cost to the United States all lands, easements, and rights-of-way necessary for construction of the project; (b) hold and save the United States free from damages due to the construction works; and (c) maintain and operate the works after completion in accordance with regulations prescribed by the Secretary of War. .

3. After due consideration of these reports, I concur in the views and recommendations of the Board. Very truly yours,

R. A. WHEELER,
Lieutenant General,

Chief of Engineers.

WAR DEPARTMENT,
BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS,

Washington, February 19, 1946. Subject: Mississippi River between Coon Rapids Dam and the mouth of the

Ohio River, vicinity of Prairie du Rocher.
To: The Chief of Engineers, United States Army.

1. This report is in response to the following resolution adopted September 18, 1944:

"Resolved, by the Committee on Flood Control, House of Representatives, That the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, created under section 3 of the River and Harbor Act approved June 13, 1902, be, and is hereby requested to review the report on the Mississippi River between Coon Rapids Dam and the mouth of the Ohio River, printed in House Document No. 669, Seventy-sixth Congress, third session, with a view to determining whether any modifications therein are desirable at the present time with particular reference to providing flood protection in the reach between the mouth of Kaskaskia River and the Fort Chartres and Ivy Landing drainage and levee district with particular reference to the town of Prairie du Rocher in Randolph County, Illinois.”

2. The Mississippi River rises in northwestern Minnesota and flows southeasterly to its junction with the Ohio River at Cairo, ill., and thence continues southerly to the Gulf of Mexico. Coon Rapids Dam is 866 miles above Cairo. Prairie du Rocher Creek and Kaskaskia River enter the Mississippi River from the east at river miles 130 and 118, respectively, above Cairo. The low area under consideration comprises about 16,000 acres of agricultural land adjacent to the Mississippi River between Prairie du Rocher Creek and Kaskaskia River. The average annual precipitation is about 40 inches. The area has a population of 1,200 engaged primarily in agriculture, the principal crops being corn and wheat. Prairie du Rocher and Modoc with populations of 650 and 100, respectively, are the only towns in the area.

3. No. improvements for flood control in the area have been authorized by Congress. In 1939, the Works Progress Administration supplied some funds to aid in cleaning out the ditch from Prairie du Rocher to the Mississippi River. A drainage and levee district was organized in 1917 to protect about 2,000 acres of land. Improvements constructed consisted of one-half mile of levee and 5 miles of ditches.

4. Floods occur about once every 18 months and cause damage principally to crops and to a less extent to highways, railways, bridges, and farm property, all in the low area between Prairie du Rocher Creek and Kaskaskia River. The average annual flood damage is estimated at $120,900 of which $57,800 is to crops, $1,600 to rural property, $4,400 to urban property, $26,800 to railroads, and $26 300 is miscellaneous. The maximum floods of comparatively recent record occurred in May-June 1943, and April 1944, but the monetary losses are not reported.

5. Local interests request protection from floods in the Mississippi River, Prairie du Rocher Creek, and Kaskaskia River. They offer cooperation to the extent required by section 3 of the Flood Control Act approved June 22, 1936.

6. The district engineer finds that the only feasible plan of improvement would be the construction of a levee along the south bank of the present channel of Prairie du Rocher Creek from the bluffs near the town to the Alississippi River, thence following the high bank of the Mississippi River to Kaskaskia River, thence along the north bank of the latter stream to the bluffs near Root, Ili. The total length of levee proposed would be 16 miles. The first cost is estimated at $2,627,000 of which $2,575,000 is for construction and $52,000 is for the lands, easements, and rights-of-way. The annual carrying charge is estimated at $103,700. The improvement would provide protection against floods with a frequency of once in 50 years to approximately 11,400 acres of high quality agricultural land now subjected to frequent flooding, and to approximately 4,600 acres of other land much of which is susceptible for cultivation or higher land use after protection. The annual benefits are estimated at $225,700 of which $109,200 is a reduction in flood damage and $116,500 is improved land use. The ratio of costs to benefits is 1.0 to 2.18. The district engineer concludes that the improvement is economically justified and he recommends it subject to the provisions that local interests provide without cost to the United States all lands, easements, and rights-of-way, hold and save the United States free from damages due to the construction works, and maintain the works after completion in accordance with standard regulations. The division engineer concurs.

7. Local interests were advised of the favorable conclusions of the division engineer and were invited to submit additional data to the Board. Careful consideration has been given to the communications received.

VIEWS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS

8. The Board concurs generally in the views and recommendations of the reporting officers. The improvement would provide protection to approximately 16,000 acres of agricultural land and produce sufficient benefits to warrant its construction.

9. Accordingly, the Board recommends adoption of a project for the protection of the area between Prairie du Rocher Creek and Kaskaskia River, Ill., consisting of levees and appurtenant works, generally in accordance with the plans of the district engineer and with such modifications as in the opinion of the Secretary of War and the Chief of Engineers may be deemed advisable, at an estimated first cost to the United States of $2,575,000 subject to the provision that local interests give assurances satisfactory to the Secretary of War that they will: (a) Provide without cost to the United States all lands, easements. and rights-of-way necessary for construction of the project; (6) hold and save

the United States free from damages due to the construction works; and (c)
maintain and operate the works after completion in accordance with regulations
prescribed by the Secretary of War.
For the Board:

R. C. CRAWFORD,
Brigadier Generol,

Senior Member.

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR,

Springfield, April 13, 1946. The CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, UNITED STATES ARMY,

Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: The review report of the report on the Mississippi River between Coon Rapids Dam and the mouth of the Ohio River, forwarded to this office under date of March 19, 1946, has been partially reviewed by State agencies.

The conclusions and recommendations of the State agencies relative to the subject report have been considered by the State Water Resources and Flood Control Board.

After consideration of the report as submitted and reviews of its content by State agencies, the State of Illinois concludes that the report is generally satisfactory to the State, provided that the State is not required to accept any contingent liability and has an opportunity to protect the interests of the State by review of the definite project plans prior to initiation of construction. Yours very truly,

Dwight H. GREEN, Governor. The CHAIRMAN. Are there any advocates of the projects, except Representative Bishop, who stated that he favors it, and has been in contact with the committee? Anybody opposed to this?

Mr. Bishop, we know of your interest along the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers. As I understand it, you favor that project ?

STATEMENT OF HON, C. W. BISHOP, A REPRESENTATIVE IN

CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF ILLINOIS

Mr. Bishop. Very much so.

The CHAIRMAN. You may make any statement you desire. Mr. Bishop. We today have received this signed statement from the Governor which you requested.

The CHAIRMAN. That is in connection with the report? Mr. BISHOP. That is correct. I have a memorandum. I do not think it is necessary for me to read it. I will file it with the clerk.

The CHAIRMAN. I will be glad for you to do that. We recall your former statement.

You think there is a definite flood problem there?
Mr. BISHOP. Yes, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. You favor the project?
Mr. Bishop. Yes, sir.

This tells the story, and I appreciate very much having the opportunity to present it to you.

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