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The CHAIRMAN. In your report there, are there any other works to be done?

Colonel HERB. We recommend construction of a closing levee to eliminate Mississippi backwater from the lower reaches of bottom lands. It would extend from State Highway 96 on the right bank of Wildcat Hollow to Bay Creek, thence along the latter to mile 5.8, thence along the section line to close with the existing Mississippi River levee. Improvement is also proposed of several minor channels in the bottom lands, and construction of appurtenant works, including two pumping stations, to remove the flow from the Sny.

The CHAIRMAN. At whose cost will that be constructed ?
Colonel HERB. That is a Federal cost, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. Who operates them and pays the cost of operating them?

Colonel HERB. The operation and expense thereof is by local interests.

The CHAIRMAN. Now, what is the estimated cost of the project?

Colonel HERB. The estimated total first cost of this project is $5,217,203, of which the non-Federal cost is estimated to be about $362,259. The ratio of cost to benefits is 1 to 1.39.

The CHAIRMAN. Subject to the usual assurances on the part of the Jocal interests?

Colonel HERB. Yes, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. Now, these assurances provide for the furnishing of the easements and lands and rights-of-way and the necessary authority to abandon bridges—make all necessary alterations and relocations of highway bridges, roads, subsurface drains, and public utilities affected by improvement. Would that require the local interests to pay for the cost of relocating the railroads?

Colonel HERB. No, sir; it does not. Railroad changes are not included in the local cooperation.

The CHAIRMAN. Who pays the cost of relocating the railroads?
General CRAWFORD. That is a Federal charge, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. I have my question answered then, and local people maintain the works. Are there local interests there that are prepared to comply with the requirements of local cooperation and furnish satisfactory assurance ?

Colonel HERB. Based on the information we have, there are, sir.

(The report of the Chief of Engineers together with the comments of the Governor of Illinois are as follows:)

WAR DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,

Washington, April 17, 1946. Subject: McCraney Creek, Hadley Creek, Kiser Creek, Six Mile Creek, and Bay

Creek, and their tributaries in Pike County, Ill. To: The Secretary of War.

1. I submit for transmission to Congress my report with accompanying papers and illustration on preliminary examination and survey of McCraney Creek, Hadley Creek, Kiser Creek, Six Mile Creek, and Bay Creek, and their tributaries in Pike County, Ill., authorized by the Flood Control Act approved June 28, 1938. This is a comprehensive report covering the Mississippi River bottom lands affected by all creeks tributary to the Sny.

2. McCraney, Hadley, Kaiser (Kiser), Six Mile, and Bay Creeks are major tributaries of the Sny, a former bychannel of the Mississippi River, in westcentral Illinois. Minor tributaries include Fall, Pigeon, Horton, and Dutch Creeks. From its head 314 miles above the mouth of the Ohio River, the Spy

meanders 60 miles generally southeast through the Mississippi bottoms to rejoin the main stream 261 miles above the mouth of the Ohio River. Mississippi River flows are diverted from the Sny at its upper end by the main river levee of the Sny Island levee drainage district. The Sny watershed comprises 195 square miles of Mississippi River bottom lands averaging 5 miles in width, and 547 square miles of uplands. Average annual precipitation is 34 inches. The watershed has a population of 22,780 engaged principally in farming and stock raising. Pittsfield and Barry, with populations of 2,884 and 1,545, respectively, are the principal towns.

3. No specific project for flood control in the area has been authorized by Congress. Between 1888 and 1913, the United States maintained as an aid to navigation on the Mississippi River, the main stem levee which was originally constructed by local interests. Since 1940, the United States raised and enlarged this levee which was turned over to local interests for maintenance, and has improved and enlarged other levees in the area. Total costs to the United States have been approximately $1,022,000. Local interests have constructed and maintained auxiliary levees, straightened and maintained channels of the Sny and major tributaries below the bluff lines, and constructed sedimentation basins at the mouths of McCraney, Hadley, and Kiser Creeks. Expenditures for this work have been reported to approximate $3,733,000.

4. Damaging floods occur at average intervals of about 2 years and inundate extensive areas of the most productive farm lands in the basin. Damage occurs chiefly to growing and stored crops, and to a less extent, to fences, roads, bridges, levees, railroads, and other property. An area of about 17,000 acres along the lower reaches of the Sny is subject to occasional overflow by backwater from Mississippi River floods. Silt carried from the uplands has depreciated the drainage systems and rendered 22,000 acres of land unproductive. The average annual flood damage is estimated at $450,200, of which $193,200 is to crops, $18,400 to property, $70,000 is annual cost of restoration of drainage systems, $3,000 is indirect damage, and $165,600 is loss of income from land rendered unproductive by silt depositions. The maximum flood of record occurred in the spring of 1944, inundated 75,000 acres of land for a period of about 3 weeks, and caused damage estimated at $670,931 of which $601,567 was to crops and $69,364 was to property exclusive of railroads.

5. Local interests desire flood protection and suggest small check dams, contour plowing, and similar improvements in the upper portions of the watershed, and further channel rectification and levee improvement in the bottom lands. They object to reservoirs on the grounds that they would needlessly destroy useful land . .

6. The district engineer finds that the most practical and feasible plan of improvement would be the diversion of the major part of the run-off from the uplands drainage area directly to the Mississippi River while the run-off from the lowlands would be collected in the Sny. Accordingly, he proposes :

(a) On Fall Creek between the bluffs and the present Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, to set back the levee on the right bank 200 feet, straighten the remaining levees, and clean the channel.

(6) To route Pigeon Creek by an improved leveed channel through a retarding and desilting reservoir adjacent to the Sny and covering approxi. mately 1.5 square miles.

(c) To divert McCraney, Hadley, and Kiser Creeks to the Mississippi River. McCraney Creek leveed diversion channel would leave the existing stream, bed above the Wabash Railroad bridge and continue south to join Hadley Creek above the present Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. Hadley Creek diversion channel would extend from State Highway 96 to its junction with McCraney Creek. The combined flow of the two creeks would be carried 5,500 feet in an improved channel to the junction with Kiser Creek diversion channel. Kiser Creek leveed diversion channel would . leave the existing stream near New Canton and extend west to join Hadley Creek in the vicinity of the Sny. From this junction a new leveed channel would extend to the Mississippi River at mile 296.5 above Cairo.

(d) To divert Horton and Dutch Creeks to the Mississippi River. The leveed Horton Creek Channel would be improved from a point approximately 1,500 feet upstream from State Highway 96 to its junction with Dutch Creek. Dutch Creek would be improved and straightened from a point 2,000 feet upstream from State Highway 96 to its junction with Horton Creek. From the junction of the two diversion channels, a leveed channel would extend to the Mississippi River at mile 288.3 above Cairo.

(e) To relocate the existing channel of Six Mile Creek from the State Highway 96 bridge to the Alton Railroad bridge. From the railroad bridge the existing channel would be modified and form a junction with the diversion channel for Bay Creek. A new leveed diversion channel would be provided for Bay Creek to its junction with Six Mile Creek diversion channel. From the junction a new leveed channel would extend to the Mississippi River one quarter mile below lock and dam No. 24.

(f) Construction of a closing levee to eliminate Mississippi River backwater from the lower reaches of the bottom lands. It would extend from State Highway 96 on the right bank of Wildcat Hollow to Bay Creek thence along the right bank of the latter to mile 5.8, thence along a section line to close with the existing Mississippi River levee.

(g) Improvement of several minor channels in the bottom lands.

(h) Construction of appurtenant works including 2 pumping stations to remove the flow from the Sny. The first cost is estimated at $5,217,203 of which $4,854,944 is Federal for the construction and $362,259 is non-Federal for the lands and rights-of-way, access roads, drainage system, bridge, and utility alterations. The annual carrying charge is estimated at $281,061. The annual benefits are estimated at $391,574 of which $191,687 is elimination of crop damage, $70,000 is elimination of recurring expenditures on the drainage system, $18,262 is elimination of property damage, $3,000 is indirect benefits, and $108,625 is the anticipated increased income from land to be protected. The ratio of costs to benefits is 1.0 to 1.39. He finds that the improvement would reduce the frequency of flood damage to about once in 50 years and that it is economically justified. He recommends it subject to the provision that local interests furnish the lands and rights-of-way, hold and save the United States free from damages due to the construction works, make the necessary alterations to roads, bridges, subsurface drains and utilities, agree to abandon obstructive bridges, and maintain and operate the works after completion in accordance with regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of War. The district engineer finds that flood damages in the upland portion of the Sny watershed are not important and that improvements there are not justified. The division engineer concurs in the views and recommendations of the district engineer.

7. The Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors concurs generally with the reporting officers in the view that the improvement is economically justified. The Board recommends the improvement subject to the provisions of local cooperation stipulated by the reporting officers.

8. After due consideration of these reports I concur in the views and recommendations of the Board. I, therefore, recommend improvement for flood protection in the Sny bottoms to provide for diversion of floodwaters of the several tributary streams directly to the Mississippi River, for pumping run-off from the local areas, and for other appurtenant works, generally in accordance with the plan of the district engineer, at an estimated first cost to the United States of $4,854,914, subject to the provision that local interests give assurances satisfactory to the Secretary of War that they will (a) furnish free of cost to the United States all lands, easements, and rights-of-way necessary for construction of the project, and the necessary authority to abandon obstructive bridges; (6) hold and save the United States free from damages due to the construction works; (c) make all necessary alterations and relocations of highway bridges, roads, subsurface drains, and public utilities affected by the improvement; and (d) maintain and operate all the works after completion in accordance with regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of War.

R. A. WHEELER,
Lieutenant General,

Chief of Engineers.

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR,

Springfield, April 13, 1946. The CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, UNITED STATES ARMY,

Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: The report of preliminary examination and survey of McCraney Creek, Hadley Creek, Kaiser Creek, Six Mile Creek, and Bay Creek, and their tributaries in Pike County, Ill., which was forwarded to this office under date of March 29, 1946, has been partially reviewed by State agencies.

The conclusions and recommendations of the State agencies relative to the subject report have been considered by the State water resources and flood control board.

After consideration of the report as submitted and reviews of its content by State agencies the State of Illinois concludes that the report is generally satisfactory to the State, provided that the State is not required to accept any contingent liability and has an opportunity to protect the interests of the State by review of the definite project plans prior to initiation of construction. Yours very truly,

Dwight H. GREEN, Governor. The CHAIRMAN. We have with us Representative Simpson who has been interested in this matter and responsible for the reports and surveys. Mr. Simpson, we will be glad to hear from you.

STATEMENT BY HON. SID SIMPSON, DISTRICT 20, ILLINOIS
Mr. SIMPSON. Thank you very much, Chairman Whittington.
I will be very brief in my statement.

The Sny Island stream and levee districts start at about Quincy, Ill., which is in the bulge of the State and goes south to about Hamburg, Ill., in Calhoun County. To the best of my knowledge, this is the only gravity district, or if it is not, it is the only gravity district being the largest gravity district in the upper Mississippi River. There is no pumping station there. The water is being excluded or being sent out into the Sny district by central gravity system.

In 1937 or 1938 there was a series of dams constructed for navigation purposes causing a higher water table. Naturally, that held the water higher in the Mississippi River, and the flood stage in place of the water going out of the Sny district, we had actual indication of the water backing up and flooding all of this land due to the water being higher in the Mississippi River than in the district. Now, the Illinois empties into the Mississippi. Just below the Illinois, the Missouri empties in—about 20 miles below. When the Missouri and the Illinois are at flood stage, then the Mississippi is in a flood stage, and we get a black flood of water downstream.

The CHAIRMAN. What do you call that? Is that a stream? Mr. SIMPSON. It is a Sny creek; that is what we call it locally. The CHAIRMAN. Was there a levee constructed by the local people? Mr. SIMPSON. This is on the Sny district on the east side, of course, of the Mississippi River.

Way back in 1888, rather 1880, the Federal Govertnment constructed for navigation some navigation levees along there.

The CHAIRMAN. Will you recall about when they built them up? Mr. SIMPSON. 1934. They elevated some levees in my own county of Greene, and I wish to state for the record to my knowledge no levee paralleling the Illinois or the Mississippi River had been elevated, broke, or caused any flood damage in 1943.

The CHAIRMAN. How wide is that valley along the Mississippi River where this Sny runs parallel with it? Mr. SIMPSON. Anywhere from 3 to 6 miles. The CHAIRMAN. All the way down the river? Mr. SIMPSON. The bluffs keep coming in. The CHAIRMAN. I can understand. Mr. SIMPSON. Due to the fact that this being a gravity district and the water table in 'the Mississippi River being held higher, and the

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Illinois and Mississippi and the Missouri at flood stage simply cause the water to back up into the Sny and inundate all that area. We have had a flood practically every 2 years, and a devastating flood to my knowledge about every 2 years. Since the 1943 flood, some of the local newspapers have started a campaign to get that thing taken care of. The engineers of Rock Island held flood-control meetings and publicly advertised and the people living within that area, those landowners voted 8 out of 10 in favor of this project.

The CHAIRMAN. And your people are willing to provide the contribution required and furnish the rights-of-way for the channelization work and

Mr. SIMPSON. To my understanding, and the report so shows as the comprehensive report of this project, where they had 30 days to appear and protest against it, and as far as our office is concerned, I do not believe we had over six and possibly eight people that were not satisfied with the engineers' plan.

The CHAIRMAN. And speaking for that area-and you represent the entire area in your district as I understand—you favor the adoption of this project ?

Mr. SIMPSON. I do; I am very much for it. Part of the district, the Sny district-is in the Quincy.

The CHAIRMAN. Who represents that district ?
Mr. SIMPSON. Mr. Chiperfield.
The CHAIRMAN. And he is cooperating with you?
Mr. SIMPSON. Very much, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. We are glad to have your statements, and the committee has got to stand in recess again. We will be back here for you next. There is roll call in the house. We will be back in about 20 minutes.

(A short recess was taken.)

PRAIRIE DU ROCHER, ILL. The CHAIRMAN. General Crawford, we also have submitted for our consideration a report, which I am sure Colonel Herb may present at this time, on the Mississippi River in the vicinity of Prairie du Rocher. Colonel, will you for the record give us your statements at this time? STATEMENT OF COL. E. G. HERB, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, CIVIL

WORKS DIVISION, OFFICE, CHIEF OF ENGINEERS Colonel HERB. This report is submitted in accordance with the Flood Control Committee resolution, adopted September 18, 1944, requesting a review of reports on Mississippi River between Coon Rapids Dam and the mouth of the Ohio River.

Prairie du Rocher Creek and Kaskaskia River enter the Mississippi River from the east at river miles 130 and 118, respectively, above Cairo. The low area under consideration comprises about 16,000 acres of agriculture land between those streams. The average annual precipitation is about 40 inches. The area has a population of 1,200, engaged primarily in agriculture, principal crops being corn and wheat. Prairie du Rocher, with a population of 650, Modoc 100, are

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